August Crime Author Interview – Doug Johnstone

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1.How did you get started writing

I’ve always written stories for as long as I can remember, but I never really did anything with them, just left them in a drawer or sometimes sent them off to competitions, but never heard anything back. I ended up going down a science route, studying physics and working as an engineer, then gave all that up to become a music journalist. When I did that, I found more motivation to get back to writing fiction, and started writing my first novel. It’s a roundabout way of getting into writing novels, as opposed to the studying English route, but it’s worked out OK in the end.

2. What drew you to crime fiction

I didn’t realise I was writing crime fiction, and even now I’m not so sure! When you say crime people think of police procedurals, and that’s not what I write. If you say thriller they think of James Patterson, and that’s not me either. I try to write about everyday people getting into extraordinary situations, and that’s where the crime element comes in. All good storytelling should contain an element of conflict in it – that’s what makes readers keep turning the pages – and crime fiction does that best of all. I’m really interested in writing about people getting embroiled in stuff and losing control, and what better field for that sort of stuff than crime fiction?

3. Which crime writers past or present have influenced your style of writing

I went through a phase a while ago of only reading classic American noir writers – people like James M Cain, Jim Thompson, Dashiel Hammett etc. I think that influenced my style of writing up to a point – I certainly favour short, sharp stories, a pared down prose style, and a less-is-more approach to writing. As for modern writers, the likes of Allan Guthrie, Megan Abbott, Sara Gran and Gillian Flynn are all doing fantastic things in crime writing, coming at the genre in new and interesting ways, and all are highly recommended.

4. Where do you draw your inspiration behind the storylines of your books

From everyday life, hopefully. Really you can get inspiration for a story from anywhere – the local newspaper, some chat down the pub, a bit of gossip on the internet, your own life. As a writer, it helps to be attuned for the juicy stuff – you should always be asking yourself “what would it feel like to be in that situation?” Like my most recent novel Gone Again is about someone’s wife going missing. That stemmed from my own life as a househusband looking after two young kids, I just thought, what the fuck would I do if my wife didn’t come home one day and no one knew where she was?

5. Did you find it hard to get publisher interest when you first started writing

I didn’t know anyone in the publishing industry at all when I first started. I wrote my first novel then bought the Writers’ & Artists’ Yearbook and emailed every editor and agent that seemed to do the sort of stuff that I had written. I got a lot of rejections, over two dozen publishers and over fifty agents. But two of the editors said they would like to see anything else I wrote, which was enough of an impetus to start writing the next novel. When I had that done, I sent it to those two editors, and they both offered to publish it. It is hard to get attention, of course, and I guess I got lucky – it’s a war of attrition, you just have to keep plugging away, improving your craft, making yourself and your work as presentable and publishable as possible, and hoping that your manuscript lands on the right desk at the right time and the person is in the right mood. I know that’s not all that encouraging, sorry, but it is tough out there.

6. Did you find the experience of writing your first novel an easy task or a quite daunting one

Daunting, definitely. I had NO IDEA what I was doing when I started writing my first novel, and in fact I totally re-wrote it after I became published (with a different novel). It took a long time and a lot of trial and error, but that’s really the only way to figure out what you are trying to do, what kind of writer you want to be, what it is you want to say, etc. Embrace the mistakes and learn from them. And that doesn’t stop with the first novel – that process keeps going with every book. You’re always learning, hopefully improving, struggling to make your story the best that it can be, plagued by self-doubt, all that usual writer guff. Stick at it though, and you will get better.

7. Do you prefer setting your books in the cities or in the rural villages

I don’t really have a preference for either. I’ve had five novels published, and a sixth one coming next year, and they’re split fifty-fifty between urban and rural. The important thing is to try to bring the setting to life. My first three novels were in rural Scottish settings, and that brings a different energy to the prose and a different feeling to the story. My most recent three are all set in Edinburgh. I think for a while I avoided setting books in Edinburgh (where I’ve lived for over twenty years), as it’s such a well-mapped city in literature, but in the end I figured that my Edinburgh is different from Ian Rankin’s, Muriel Spark’s, Irvine Welsh’s etc, so fuck it, and I just got on with it. I think I’ve had enough of Edinburgh for a while, though, and the next one is going to be in a small town – back to the insular creepiness of rural Scotland for me!

8. The books you write are all stand alone novels have you ever wanted to write a sequel to any of them if you could

The next one coming out is loosely connected to my fourth novel Hit & Run, but it’s not really a sequel. I’m not that interested in writing sequels or a series of books, maybe if I come across a scenario and a central protagonist I want to spend more time with, that might happen. But generally, the central characters in my novels go through such a monumental clusterfuck situation in the novel that it would be hard to revisit any of them and not have them be total basketcases!

9. What kind of research did you have to undertake for your books

Iain Banks said he wrote novels so that he didn’t have to do any research, and I kind of go along with that. Having said that, I do visit everywhere that appears in the novels – I don’t walk around with my notebook out jotting stuff down, but I try to soak up the atmosphere of a place if I’m going to be using it as a location. As for the other stuff, I tend to use a lot of my own life and my friends’ lives as backstory and stuff like that, hopefully it lends an amount of authenticity to the story. That’s been most apparent in Gone Again, I guess, which is very similar to my own life at home and my relationship with my son, at the start of the book anyway.

10. Are the characters in your books based on any real life people

There are elements that are, but it’s usually a mix of different traits from different people. I try to make my characters as lifelike as possible, but I suppose all authors do that, so that’s nothing out the ordinary. Again, with Gone Again, because so much of the background is similar to my own, a lot of people equate me with the main character Mark. There are similarities, but also differences. In the end, I suppose I use real people as jumping off points for characters, accentuating some facets of their personalities and getting rid or changing others.

11. Since you have started writing crime novels have any known authors given you any advice

My agent is Allan Guthrie, who is also an amazing Scottish crime writer, and he’s given me plenty of advice on my writing, he’s probably been the biggest influence on my writing style and subject matter over the years. If I had to sum up all his invaluable advice, it would be ‘less is more’.

12. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa

See my answers above – yes, all the time. The central characters of all of my novels so far have elements of my own personality in them – that’s the only way I can really write convincing fiction, I think. But my next novel out in 2014 has a twenty-year-old woman as its central character, so it’ll be interesting to see how that goes down.

13. If you can can you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned

Yeah, the next novel is called The Dead Beat, and is due out in June next year. It’s about a trainee journalist called Martha who winds up being the obituary writer for a newspaper in Edinburgh. Bad things start to happen, both professionally and personally, and she has to try to sort it out and stay alive.

14. Have you been surprised by the success of your novels

When I first started writing novels, part of my motivation was that I wasn’t seeing the world as I knew it around me reflected in the books I was reading. It’s a cliché, but I was really writing for myself, the kind of book I would like to read. So I thought my books would only be of interest to a few mates, really. I am continually surprised, amazed and delighted that people are reading my work and connecting with it –it’s an incredibly humbling experience.

15. As a blossoming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share

It’s rather banal advice, but just stick at it! It’s incredibly easy to become discouraged or succumb to self-doubt, but just keep plugging away, keep trying to improve your writing, and hopefully you’ll catch a break or two along the way. Keep writing and reading as much as possible, it’s only by writing that you can improve, and it’s only by exposure to other writing, good and bad, that you can see where you might fit into the storytelling world. Hope that help

For more Information on the Books by Doug Johnstone you can check out his amazon author page at http://www.amazon.co.uk/Doug-Johnstone/e/B0034PCMZO

You can read his own blog at http://dougjohnstone.wordpress.com/

Here are some events that he has coming up:

1st August, Blackwell’s Writers at the Fringe

Blackwell’s South Bridge, Edinburgh, 6pm, Free but ticketed.

I’m doing a 15-minute slot alongside a brilliant and eclectic list of other writers – Helen Grant, Catherine Deveney, Regi Claire and Peter Kerr. More info here:

bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/editorial/shops/instore_events_view.jsp#Edinburgh

15th August, Edinburgh International Book Festival

Charlotte Square, Edinburgh, 6.45pm, £10.

This is a joint event with the amazing Laura Lippman. Gonna be a doozy! More info here:

http://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/doug-johnstone-laura-lippman

14th September, Bloody Scotland

Academy Suite, Stirling Highland Hotel, 6.30pm, £7.

A joint event with Gordon Ferris and Gordon Brown. Tickets and info here:

http://www.bloodyscotland.com/men-on-a-mission/

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Edinburgh International Book Festival – Treat

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With the Book Festival and other events starting next month. I am able to announce that next month’s Crime Author Interview will be with Doug Johnstone, author of Gone Again, Smoke Heads, Hit and Run, Tombstonning and The Ossians

You can catch Doug Johnstone discussing his novels and doing signings at the following events during August and September at the following locations

1st August, Blackwell’s Writers at the Fringe

Blackwell’s South Bridge, Edinburgh, 6pm, Free but ticketed.

I’m doing a 15-minute slot alongside a brilliant and eclectic list of other writers – Helen Grant, Catherine Deveney, Regi Claire and Peter Kerr. More info here:

bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/editorial/shops/instore_events_view.jsp#Edinburgh

15th August, Edinburgh International Book Festival

Charlotte Square, Edinburgh, 6.45pm, £10.

This is a joint event with the amazing Laura Lippman. Gonna be a doozy! More info here:

http://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/doug-johnstone-laura-lippman

14th September, Bloody Scotland

Academy Suite, Stirling Highland Hotel, 6.30pm, £7.

A joint event with Gordon Ferris and Gordon Brown. Tickets and info here:

http://www.bloodyscotland.com/men-on-a-mission/

July Crime Author Interview – Sinclair MacLeod

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Q, How did you get started writing A, I always wrote but had never finished anything until the death of my son in 2007. It was a turning point where I decided I could no longer put off my dreams and finally finished my first novel in 2010.

Q, What drew you to crime fiction? A, I have always loved mysteries dating back to being a boy reading the Secret Seven stories of Enid Blyton.

Q, Which crime writers past or present have influenced your style of writing? A, I always loved the hard-boiled private eye stories of Hammett, Chandler and Ross Macdonald. They were the inspiration for Craig Campbell who I see as a modern Scottish version of those honorable, tough men. I also love many of my fellow Scottish crime writers, so there are probably some of them in there too.

Q, Which series of books to you find easier to write, the Reluctant Detective or Russell and Menzies A, Craig is easier because I’m not constrained by the rules of police procedure as I am in the Russell & Menzies books.

Q, Did you find it hard to get publisher interest when you first started writing A, Publishers are having a tough time and are looking for surefire sales, so new writers find it difficult to get noticed. Self-publishing has allowed me to get my books out to the readers.

Q, why did you decide to set the majority of your books in Glasgow? A, I’m a Glaswegian born and bred. The city is a complex mix of contradictions that make it almost a character in its own right.

Q, Did you find it hard to write the reluctant detective novels the Island Murder and the Good Girl as they were mostly set outside of Glasgow A, The two novels outside the city were set in places I was very familiar with, that each had their own very different characteristics. A private detective is allowed that little bit of extra scope to travel outside the city streets.

Q, Do you think that with the amalgamation in April of the Scottish police force in to one organization could affect your Russell and Menzies books in the future A, The new force means that I’ll need to do more research but it opens up the possibility of Russell & Menzies visiting other cities, so it could be interesting I think

Q, What kind of research did you have to undertake for your books A, For Soul seeker I spent time in the new Glasgow mortuary which was invaluable and fascinating. I also spoke to a police detective and pathology technician. I love the research because I get to speak to people about their job.

Q, Was it an easy switch for you to go from writing about one major character, the Reluctant Detective books to having a group of major characters, Russell and Menzies books A, After speaking to the policeman, the police procedural books became a lot more complicated. Category A murders are investigated by huge numbers of detectives and I felt I had to reflect that in some way. It gives me a huge creative sandbox to play in but it is definitely tougher than writing Craig.

Q, Since you have started writing crime novels have any known authors given you any advice A, Unfortunately not, although I have made contact with James Oswald who has won a publishing contract on the strength of his self-published books.

Q, Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa A, I wanted my detectives to be decent people first and foremost. Craig, Tom and Alex all have an essence of decency that I hope reflects my own approach to life and other people but in saying that I wish I had their bravado. Craig’s Ducati is definitely one part of him that I would love to have

Q, What do you see for the future of the Reluctant Detective and Russell and Menzies in your books A, I always have ideas and I’m currently writing the first part of a trilogy featuring Tom Russell as a young detective. My next full novel will be a very dramatic return for Craig.

Q. Have you been surprised by the success of your novels A, To some degree yes as I know how competitive the market is. I think Craig was a refreshing change from traditional police detectives, so that helped to gain some positive reviews. I set out to entertain and hope that people will continue to enjoy what I write.

Q, As a blossoming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share A, Write what you believe in, if it’s the kind of thing you would like to read, others will too. Get an editor, particularly if you decide to self-publish. Don’t put off publishing because you want the book to be perfect, no one has ever written the perfect book, no one ever will. Be positive and believe in yourself.

Reluctant Dectetive Books

The Reluctant Dectetive
The Good Girl
The Killer Performer
The Island Murder

Russell and Menzies Books

Soulseeker
Inheritance

For more information check out the following websites

http://www.reluctantdetective.com/

Sinclair MacLeod Amazon Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sinclair-Macleod/e/B007O2VS3A

Or his Facebook Book Author Page

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sinclair-Macleods-author-page/116319815088342?ref=ts&fref=ts

One To Watch July Crime Author Interview – D.A. Meyrick

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1. How did you get started writing

I began writing at quite a young age – I even had a go at a novel when I was 8, however it never saw the light of day. From there on in, I wrote pieces for the local newspaper and the school magazine.

2. What drew you to crime fiction

I’ve always enjoyed crime fiction as a reader, so I suppose it came naturally to write about it. Also, I am an ex-police officer, so that helps with experience, context and detail. Originally, I intended to write historical fiction, however, realising that a huge amount of research is required in order to write successfully in that genre, it was better to follow the old cliché and write what you know. I didn’t want to find myself lacking in the discipline required to write a book, after completing my research. Such has been the success of Whisky From Small Glasses, I haven’t regretted my decision.

3. Which crime writers past or present have influenced your style of writing

Clearly, being a Scottish writer in the crime genre, Rankin, MacIlvanny et al. have been most influential; though, going back to the birth of the genre, I’ve loved the work of Wilkie Collins and Marcel Proust – so much so, that there is a little nod to the latter in Whisky From Small Glasses.

4.  What was the inspiration behind the storyline of whiskey from small glasses

I wanted to take the detective out of the urban setting and place him rurally, where crime is often less frequent, however has a wider and more long-lasting effect on the whole community when it does occur. Once DCI Daley was in Kinloch, it was quite easy to weave a web of intrigue around him and his situation. Now that I am nearing the completion of the next ‘Daley’ novel, I hope that I’m on my way to giving every book in the series a slightly different emphasis. The last thing I want is for Kinloch to be another Midsommer, statistically the murder capital of the UK.

5. Did you find it hard to get publisher interest for whiskey from small glasses

As a first-time writer, the apocryphal tales about myriad rejections are at the forefront of one’s mind when it comes to sending out a début MSS. In all honesty, I expected to have to self-publish my first book, in the hope it would attract interest from publishers once it had gained some traction. I was amazed when, only a few weeks after I began the process of finding a publisher, I was signed up by Ringwood.

6. Did you find the experience of writing your first novel an easy task or a quite daunting one

At first, when you try to imagine the enormity of making 100k words into a coherent work of fiction, it appears a most daunting task. However, once I got down to it, I was pleasantly surprised how quickly the word count mounted up, and the story progressed. I think momentum is really important when writing -every little step takes you further along the way.

7. Why did you decide to set your books in rural south west scotland

I based Whisky From Small Glasses in Kintyre, quite simply because it’s where I’m originally from, so I know the area really well. Add to this, the warmth and humour of the people, plus the beauty of the setting, I’m surprised that it has been so long since the peninsula was used as a setting for fiction.

8. Do you think that with the amalgamation in April of the Scottish police force in to one organization could effect your books in the future

The reorganisation of the police in Scotland, has already had an influence on my writing. When I began writing Whisky, it wasn’t obvious what was going to happen, so I had to tread carefully. In my next book, The Death of Remembrance, Police Scotland is a reality, so I’m on firmer ground. Ultimately, I’m sure that this new dynamic will prove a treasure trove of new fictional possibilities for Scottish crime writers.

9. What kind of research did you have to undertake for your books

Thankfully, being an ex-police officer, I had a reasonably firm grip on procedure etc. I have even used elements of crimes I had encountered as the inspiration for parts of the story. So, my main concern is more with the minutia of the novel – what makes it tick, if you like. I hope it’s convincing.

10. Are the characters in your books based on any real life people

Haha, the fifty billion dollar question! As most reader’s will have spotted, Kinloch is a fictional Campbeltown; and, being a small community, speculation has been rife as to who that character, or this, really are. In fact, though I have used aspects of people I have known throughout my life within the characterisation in my books, only one individual in Whisky From Small Glasses, is as they appear in real life, and they know who they are. The rest are composites, part real at times, though mostly imaginary, in the way many write, I presume.

11. Since you have started writing crime novels have any known authors given you any advice

Many people have been kind enough to offer me advice as I’ve struggled away. I keep going back to Angus MacVicar, the late Kintyre author, who gave me such sound advice, as a boy. I think the most important lesson was ‘be yourself, don’t try to copy someone else’ – I hope I’ve managed to do that. Each individual’s method, experience and outlook on life are their own. At the end of the day, it is how advice is assimilated that matters.

12. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa

I often get asked that, and I suppose the only correct answer is all of them, and none of them. My family tell me I have a similar temper to Jim Daley, but I think they’re wrong, as I’m a pussy cat, really. They all come out of my fevered imaginings, so good, or bad, I’m to blame!

13. What do you see for the future of Jim Daley in your books

Like many fictional detectives, my intention is for Jim Daley – and the rest of my main characters, come to that – to have multi-layers. I am a huge fan of some of the latest drama from the USA, especially shows like The Soporanos, or Boardwalk Empire; art should reflect life, and nobody is all good or all bad. Life throws curved balls at us all of the time, so I think it is important that my work reflects the full spectrum of a personality.

14. Where you surprised when the Scots Magazine wanted to interview and review your book

I was flattered to be featured in The Scots Magazine, and to be in receipt of such a good review. I have been contacted by media outlets from all over the world since the publication of Whisky From Small Glasses, and the media, in all of its forms, play a huge role in getting books noticed. I’ve been very fortunate to have appeared in the national press on a number of occasions, as well as TV and radio. Shortly after publication, I was lucky, when Whisky was named ‘Book of the Week’ in The Herald Magazine; that gave me a great launchpad.

15. As a blossoming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share

I always hesitate to offer advice, however, from my meagre experience as a published crime writer, I would say, never give up, is the most important lesson. Remember, not everyone will like your work – if we all liked the same things it would be a very sad, one-dimensional world, indeed, so take criticism with that in mind. My step-daughter, Rachel Margaret Kennedy, is well on the way to finishing her first novel, provisionally entitled I Know You, an atmospheric YA chiller. I’m astonished by how well she writes, so instead of me handing out advice, maybe I should be taking some, if I’m to stay ahead of the game!

WHISKY FROM SMALL GLASSES
Published
01/11/2012
Publisher
Ringwood Publishing
ISBN
9781901514087

R.I.P Frederic Lindsay and Book free on Kindle

Was checking out The amazon free books list and found this book Ripped  by the late Scottish Crime Author and creator of the D.I Jim Melldrum books Frederic Lindsay.

The amazon link for the book can be found here

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ripped-ebook/dp/B00DM8QM7M/ref=sr_1_3?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1373458200&sr=1-3&keywords=frederic+lindsay

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I unfortunately did not know that he had passed away infill I saw reviews saying the late author so here is a obituary for.  Wonderful author

Frederic Lindsay (12 August 1933 – 31 May 2013) [1] was a Scottish crime writer, who was born in Glasgow and lived in Edinburgh. He was a full-time writer from 1979 and previously worked as a lecturer, teacher and library assistant. He was active in a number of literary organisations including the Society of Authors, International PEN (a worldwide writers’ association promoting freedom of expression) and the Scottish Arts Council. In addition to novels he also wrote for TV, radio and the theatre. Two of his novels have been made into films

Bibliography

The Stranger From Home (2008)
Tremor of Demons (2007)
The Endings Man (2005)
Darkness In My Hand (2001)
Death Knock (2000)
Idle Hands (1999)
A Kind of Dying (1998)
Kissing Judas (1997)
Other works by Frederic Lindsay[edit]
My Life As A Man (2006)
After the Stranger Came (1992)
A Charm Against Drowning (1988)
Jill Rips (1987)
Brond (1984)
And Be The Nations Again (Poems) (1975)

A Summer of Crime

Away on holiday in two weeks time so the question after deciding on what to pack is what do I want to put on the kindle to read, at the moment I have picked four books

1, Pray for the Dying – Quintin Jardine

‘After what happened, none of us can be sure we’re going to see tomorrow’

The killing was an expert hit. Three shots through the head, as the lights dimmed at a celebrity concert in Glasgow. A most public crime, and Edinburgh Chief Constable Bob Skinner is right in the centre of the storm, as it breaks over the Strathclyde force.
The shooters are dead too, killed at the scene. But who sent them?
The crisis finds Skinner, his private life shattered by the shocking end of his marriage, taking a step that he had sworn he never would. Tasked by Scotland’s First Minister with the investigation of the outrage, he finds himself quickly uncovering some very murky deeds…The trail leads to London, where national issues compromise the hunt. Skinner has to rattle the bars of the most formidable cage in the country, and go head to head with its leading power brokers . . . a confrontation that seems too much, even for him. Can the Chief solve the most challenging mystery of his career . . . or will failure end it

2, The ChessMen – Peter May

THE NEW START. Fin Macleod, now head of security on a privately owned Lewis estate, is charged with investigating a spate of illegal game-hunting taking place on the island.

THE OLD FRIEND. This mission reunites him with Whistler Macaskill – a local poacher, Fin’s teenage intimate, and possessor of a long-buried secret.

THE FINAL CHAPTER. But when this reunion takes a violent, sinister turn and Fin puts together the fractured pieces of the past, he realizes that revealing the truth could destroy the future

3, Missing Believed Dead – Chris Longmuir

Missing children! Internet predators! Dead bodies! She crossed his arms over his chest, and placed the jade beads in his eyes. ‘To remind you of me,’ she said. Jade was 13 when she disappeared, five years ago, and DS Bill Murphy suspects someone from her family is responsible for recent Dundee murders. But is it her mother, Diane, who now suffers from OCD? Or Emma, her twin sister, who was catatonic for a year after Jade’s disappearance. Or Jade’s brother, Ryan, who enjoys dressing in women’s clothes and is going through a sexuality crisis, unsure whether or not he is gay. What happened to Jade? Is she alive or dead? Or has she returned to wreak a terrible revenge on all male predators? Chris Longmuir is an award winning novelist. Night Watcher, the first book in the Dundee Crime Series, won the Scottish Association of Writers’ Pitlochry Award, and the sequel, Dead Wood, won the Dundee International Book Prize, as well as the Pitlochry Award.

4, Dyed in the Wool – Ed James

Detective Constable Scott Cullen’s professional and private lives are at opposite ends of the spectrum. His career is impacted by the jockeying for position ahead of the formation of the Scottish Police Service, as much as by his own inability to push his case for promotion.  Meanwhile, his relationship with DS Sharon McNeill goes from strength-to-strength – dinner with both sets of parents is interrupted by a call to action.

A body has been found in a Range Rover at the foot of a shale bing in West Lothian.

Cullen is forced to go back to his old stomping ground, haunted by figures from his past. DS Colin Methven, the latest officer occupying the position that Cullen has long coveted, is intent on straightening out Cullen’s cowboy nature, which has fractured his friendship with DC Angela Caldwell. Lurking in the background is DI Paul Wilkinson, trying to push Cullen back to a recent major case. As the mysteries are compounded, Cullen starts to feel lost among the dyed in the wool.

So readers what will you be reading this Summer

Lynsey xx

July Crime Question

This months questions is if you could meet and interview any Crime writers alive or dead who would you choose as your top ten

My choices would be

1, Agatha Christie

2, Ian Rankin

3, Quintin Jardine

4, Alex Gray and Lin Anderson

5, Ann Cleeves

6, Peter May

7, Denise Mina

8, William MacIvanney

9, R.D. Wingfield

10, Bill Knox

Who would you choose as your top ten

Lynsey xx