Free book 

If you are looking for a good e book to buy and you don’t want to spend money and you love crime fiction, then this is the book for you and it’s free on Amazon kindle at the moment

The evil that Andromeda saw in Glasgow Central Station and why she alone could see it was beyond her powers of explanation. But she told the police anyway and in that moment, the secrets of her past come back to try to destroy her. The karmic beasts arrive from all quarters, most of all from inside herself. 
Detective Inspector Donnelly investigates a gory murder in a Glasgow alley and has little more than Annie’s bizarre information to go on. Following it would make him as crazy as her. 
Whatever he thinks, she knows a darker evil is haunting the city that police will have little power against. 
But maybe she could see it coming.

To buy the ebook for yourself, you can go to the Amazon link below

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Divining-Murder-Andromeda-Book-1-ebook/dp/B01EQC5NBI/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1464076095&sr=1-1&keywords=Gm+Cameron

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Free book

If you are looking for a good e book to buy and you don’t want to spend money and you love crime fiction, then this is the book for you and it’s free on Amazon kindle at the moment

While investigating the murder of a former detective, DI Frank Miller begins to see the connection between this and the murder of the head of Edinburgh’s Serious Crime Unit. As the investigation unfolds, a 25 year-old murder case is re-opened, and when Miller delves into the past, he finds that somebody had a secret that is costing people their lives. He also discovers the awful truth of who really killed his wife in a hit-and-run two years ago, and how his wife’s killer is coming after him…

To buy the ebook for yourself, you can go to the Amazon link below

https://www.amazon.co.uk/CRASH-POINT-Frank-Miller-Book-ebook/dp/B00QFSJTXK?ie=UTF8&ref_=zg_bs_3746215031_f_1

May 2016 crime author of the month interview with Oscar DeMuriel

  
 

1. How did you get started writing?

My very first attempt was at writing a series of adventures of a triceratops and a stegosaurus and their turbulent relationship with a t-rex. However, I knew I wanted to become a writer when I read Jurassic Park (there is a pattern emerging here…). I still go back to Michael Crichton when I think my action scenes are slacking off.

 

2. What drew you to write a crime novel

I am a huge fan of detective and mystery fiction (Agatha Christie, Conan Doyle, Ian Rankin, and in fact Isaac Asimov wrote some of my favourite mystery stories), but just as important as the cases themselves I wanted to create a detective duo and follow their lives across a long story arc.

 

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

Of course Arthur Conan Doyle. I read my first Holmes story as a young boy, and I’ve been a fan ever since. The Hound of the Baskervilles is a personal favourite, and you can tell it had a deep influence on the Frey & McGray stories.

More recently I drew a lot of inspiration from C.J. Sansom’s very atmospheric descriptions of Tudor London. Even though we work with different periods and places, I wanted to produce a similar effect: make people feel like they were really there in the action, with the temperatures, the noises and the smells.

I also read a lot of 19th century Gothic novels to develop the right voice. Dracula is a favourite, still frightening despite being more than 100 years old (watch out for book 3: Bram Stoker might have an important role)

 

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

Extremely. Sorry to say so! It took a lot of perseverance (borderline sheer stubbornness) to get first an agent and then a publisher, but when it happened it was just right.

 

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novels, do you have a particular favourite one?

I of course love Frey and McGray, but there are also some secondary characters I particularly enjoy writing. Lady Glass and Madame Katerina always steal the scene.

 

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your Novels?

Loads, loads, and then some. I have a pile of books next to my desk devoted only to research: history, chemistry, medicine, dialect, music, folklore, fashion, horse breeding… But I enjoy the process, especially when you find some cool detail you never knew existed and it fits your story perfectly. That happened more than once for the third book (coming out next year! See below).

 

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

Very rarely do I base a character entirely on a real person, but I do borrow bits from here and there. I also look at people on the street/office/bus and pick physical traits or voices or attitudes I can use. For historical fiction I also like to look at old photos and portraits and think what that person would have been like.

 

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there

I hope it is the very eclectic nature of the books. They’re a bit of crime, a bit of gothic,, a bit of horror and a bit of slapstick comedy. I also want each book in the series to be very different from the rest, so expect some surprises.

 

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

People who know me say that Frey sounds exactly like me, which is a wee bit scary! Having said that, his sweet tooth and foodie/winey tastes are definitely me.

McGray, I must admit, usually says the things I wish I could if I had the guts to (and the muscle, of course!)

 

 

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned.

The current plan is for 9 books, but things might change!

I have just finished the first draft of book 3, which I’m really, really excited about. Think Macbeth, Bram Stoker, and the most famous actors of the time coming all together. It’s the most complex plot I’ve written so far and it’s full of historical facts that just intermingle incredibly well (I hope it’s not just me!).

 

 

11. Out of all the Novels you have written do you have a favourite one that stands out to you? 

Mmmm, difficult one! I’m actually very proud of certain aspects of each book. The Strings of Murder has two scenes I still re-read with a grin on my face, and I really like how A Fever of The Blood flows kind of breathlessly. However, I this third book is coming out really well, and I think will be very hard to beat (again, I hope it’s not just me!).

 

 

12. As an up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share

Writing-wise: create something you enjoy yourself. Love your characters, laugh with them and cry with them, and entertain yourself. Not only to engage your readers, but you’ll thank yourself when you’re on the 20th round of edits/proof-reads (when you want the darn thing to go away) and suddenly you find a joke you didn’t remember, or an exciting scene, and you remember why you’re putting yourself through all this.

 

Getting published-wise, some tough love: If you want a writing career, really think of it as a career. Not only will it include all the mundane aspects of a day job (things taking longer than you expect, having to make yourself a name, dealing with admin/tax, etc.) but it will also demand just as much (or more!) hard work. However, if you love your craft, it is definitely worth it.

FREY AND McGRAY NOVELS

1. The Strings of Murder

2. Fever of the Blood

The Hunt (Short Story)
http://www.oscardemuriel.com
Twitter @Oscardemuriel

Amazon Author Page 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Oscar-de-Muriel/e/B00O7FW0EI/ref=la_B00O7FW0EI_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1461395488&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fever-Blood-Frey-McGray-Book-ebook/dp/B013S3Y4P2?ie=UTF8&keywords=fever%20of%20the%20blood&qid=1461395562&ref_=sr_1_1&s=books&sr=1-1
 

May 2016 crime author of the month interview with G M Cameron 


1. How did you get started writing? I’ve written all my life, really. Remember writing ‘novels’ on jotter pages tied with blue wool to get the attention of my adored, much older, brother. Most were set in America. This being one generic place to me at the time.

One line read, ‘Oh, Jim when will you realise I don’t see the colour of your skin, just the man inside?’ So right-on, baby.

2. What drew you to write a crime novel 

Love them. Read them.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing? 

I think some might duck if I mentioned them by name – don’t want to associate them with producing me. But in Glasgow writers, I think we have a rich seam of great crime novelists. Denise Mina’s first trilogy (starting with Garnethill) made me tingle.

I love Phil Rickman’s style – I’m a bit obsessed and stalk him on Twitter. He writes spooky things that are full of real people and his policeman is Liverpudlian – so he cracks jokes like a Glaswegian. But I never read him before I wrote DM, but maybe he has influenced the edits! I love stuff that has humour – it’s a Glasgow must especially when things are dark. Some of the funniest people I ever knew were Pathology lab workers from a Glasgow hospital.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

I got quite a few publishers to request the whole book (s) – very exciting – but it didn’t come to anything. I finally decided to S-P after reading Konrath’s legendary blog. I put up a Regency Romance that I’d written strictly for the family many years ago just to learn how KDP worked. And unexpectedly, it did well. In the top ten in its category for a wee while. It encouraged me to go forward.

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novel,do you have a particular favourite one? 

I love my central character Andromeda. She’s not particularly courageous, but she feels a sort of moral responsibility to get involved. And her much tougher friend Doll is someone who I feel we’d all like to be secretly. Bound only by her own opinion and fully active in any situation with no need whatsoever to be nice. My shadow self, maybe.

6. What kind of research have you had to undertake for your Novel? 

My life thus far, I suppose. Then my policemen began to takeover and I had to consult frequently with friends I knew. The religious background is fairly accurate – it’s what I’ve studied. A lot of the Wiccan stuff is made up (it’s a novel) because a) it’s not really serious Wicca or paganism – it’s dysfunctional, and b) Wicca is differently practised and though tracing back to older roots has broken paths –it’s hard to know where the traditions come from, hard to be accurate. I was helped though by some online neo-pagans who were very helpful.

 7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

Churned up bits of loads of people I know – but I would never consciously model a character on someone real, only a characteristic, perhaps.

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there?

I think that’s for my readers to decide. I hope there is some discussion on the ‘great beyond’.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa? 

Wee bits, but I’m not telling you. Well, Andromeda’s vintage clothes thing came from a time in my life, I suppose.

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned.

There is the second in the series. It deals with events in my life. And it’s kind of a Freudian ‘wish-fulfilment’ version. In crime fiction many things are resolved.

11. Do you have a favourite scene if your novel and why?

I like the scene where Andromeda challenges DI Donnelly’s scepticism – and gives him a headache.

12. As an up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share?

I wouldn’t dream … Except to say, writing has to be a fuel for you before it is any use to anyone else

The evil that Andromeda saw in Glasgow Central Station and why she alone could see it was beyond her powers of explanation. But she told the police anyway and in that moment, the secrets of her past come back to try to destroy her. The karmic beasts arrive from all quarters, most of all from inside herself. 

Donnelly investigates a gory murder in a Glasgow alley and has little more than Annie’s bizarre information to go on. Following it would make him crazy as her

Yet whatever he thinks, she knows a darker evil is haunting the city that police will have little power against. 

But maybe she could see it coming. 

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/Divining-Murder-1586163771695327/
Amazon Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Divining-Murder-Andromeda-Book-1-ebook/dp/B01EQC5NBI?ie=UTF8&keywords=Divining%20Murder&qid=1461583765&ref_=sr_1_1&s=digital-text&sr=1-1

May 2016 Crime author of the month interview with Alan Alexander

1. How did you get started writing?

 ​I was an academic for most of my professional career, having started in the ‘publish or ​​perish’ atmosphere of North American universities. So I had to write academic stuff, ​​though I had also tried my hand at student journalism at Glasgow University. I really ​​wanted to be a journalist, but academic life seemed less precarious for a married man with ​a young family. Somewhere, unformed in the back of my mind, there was an ambition to ​write fiction. Or rather, a curiosity about whether I could do it. I found time to scratch that ​itch only after I retired: my first crime novel appeared in my seventieth year.

 

2. What drew you to write a crime novel?

 

​I had an idea for a murder mystery that would draw on my academic background as

​an expert in government, politics and public sector management, and on my experience as ​a public servant of working in large, complex organizations. I couldn’t make the idea work ​in its original form, but the notion of a body discovered after fifty years in the ground ​​survived and was the basis for Bloody Royals. I thought I would be better at plot-driven ​​rather than character-driven fiction, though I recognized that the invention of strong ​​characters would be crucial to the development of plot. All of that pointed towards crime ​​fiction.

 

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

 

​Given my background, I’ve had to read a lot of turgid academic prose, in which the clarity of ​the ideas gets concealed by the obscurity of the style. So a negative influence came from ​deciding that one should try to write simple, clear prose, with a minimum of complexity and ​a maximum of impact. Quite early on, I read almost everything George Orwell ever wrote. ​I knew that I would never write that kind of clear, limpid, lucid prose – ‘subject, object, ​​predicate’, as my secondary school English teacher emphasized – but it was a style to ​​aspire to. Among contemporary writers, few are better than William Boyd and John le ​​Carre. A wonderful recent discovery was Stoner, by John Williams, originally published in ​1965, and largely forgotten until it was reissued in 2013. A campus novel rather than a ​​crime novel, but beautifully written.

 

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

 

​Still do! It’s a fiercely competitive and very crowded field. Most of the agents I contacted ​before I self-published my first novel as an e-book simply didn’t reply; a few said on their ​​websites that their lists were closed; one prominent agent asked for sample chapters and ​then failed to contact me further. I continue to try to find an agent to take me on, for ​​conventional publication, promoted by a publisher, is still the best way to get a book ​​noticed, and read. Good reviews (mainly!) on Amazon help, but it’s not enough to get a ​​writer widely noticed. It’s important, as all aspiring authors will tell you, not to take ​​rejection personally and to keep at it.

 

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novels, do you have a particular favourite one?

 

​It would be a surprise if I didn’t say DI/DCI Vanessa Fiske. She’s the core of the books, a ​consummate professional, but prone to the self-doubt that affects many women in male-​​dominated professions. I also have a soft spot for Harry Conival, the hardbitten, cynical ​​press officer who presents as an idle sod, but can’t quite conceal his professionalism.

 

 6. What kind of research have you had to undertake for your Novels?

 

​The internet is a wonderful thing! I once heard a very distinguished writer at a literary ​​festival confess that he had never visited the city that was so much a part of his latest ​​novel, which I had recently read. Somehow, that stuck in my mind. On technical matters ​that are central to the plot, I talk to the appropriate expert. My academic past, and my ​​current position as General Secretary of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (Scotland’s ​​National Academy), are useful in securing access to the best people.

 

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

 

​Not consciously! When I re-read my books (to ensure consistency among them), however, ​I sometimes see characteristics that I remember from people I’ve met, or worked with. But ​they’re composites rather than clones.

 

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there?

 

​That’s for others to judge! I can say only that I’ve tried to make them plot-driven, with a ​​preponderance of dialogue over exposition and narrative description. I’ve also avoided ​​gratuitous violence and not been afraid to allow characters to be opinionated and ​​intelligent. Does that make the books ‘stand out’? Again, not my call!

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

 

​Some of my readers say they can hear my voice in the words of some of my ​​​characters…And sometimes I indulge my prejudices, I fear.

 

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peek into any future novels you have planned.

 

​I’ll say only that there’s a clue at the end of By All Means to the plot of the next Fiske ​​and MacNee Mystery, which I hope to publish later this year.

11. Out of all the Novels you have written do you have a favourite one that stands out to you?

 

​Of the three so far, By All Means, because it situates a strong story in a very real world of ​Scottish politics, but watch out for the next one!

 

12. As an up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share?

 

​Early in my academic career, I had colleague whose advice to younger staff members was ​always, ‘Don’t get dis-en-couraged!’ I can’t do better than that.

LINKS TO MY E-BOOKS

 

BY ALL MEANS

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00KIT6PLG?*Version*=1&*entries*=0

 

BLOODY ROYALS

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bloody-Royals-Fiske-MacNee-Mysteries-ebook/dp/B00UNJJE6O/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1426263193&sr=1-1&keywords=Alan+Alexander

 

TWIN TRACK TO DEATH

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Twin-Track-Death-Mystery-Mysteries-ebook/dp/B017BYVBSC/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1446458370&sr=1-1&keywords=Twin+Track+to+Death

Twitter: @alan_alexander7