There’s been a murder picks of the Aye Write book Festival , Glasgow post 2

Nick Triplow: Getting Carter

20th Mar 2018  •  7:00PM – 8:00PM  •  Glasgow Film Theatre

Getting Carter is a meticulously researched and riveting account of the career of a doomed genius. The talk will be followed by a screening of the 1971 classic film.

The film Get Carter was based on a book called Jack’s Return Home by Ted Lewis. The influence of both book and film is strong to this day, but what of the man who wrote this seminal work? Born in Manchester in 1940, he grew up in postwar Humberside, attending Hull Art School before heading for London. His life, a cycle of obscurity to glamour and back to obscurity. He had eight books published but, his life fell apart, his marriage ended, he returned to Humberside and died aged only 42. Getting Carter is a meticulously researched and riveting account of the career of a doomed genius. The talk will be followed by a screening of the 1971 classic film.

Tickets: £10

Clare Mackintosh, Sarah Vaughan & Fiona Cummins: Unputdownable Thrillers

21st Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  Mitchell Library

Whether you call them, ‘Domestic noir’ or ‘Grip-lit’ or the old favourite ‘Psychological Thriller’ the three authors appearing together here certainly know a thing or two about the genre!

The past few years has seen the unstoppable rise of a certain kind of crime novel, whether you call them, ‘Domestic noir’ or ‘Grip-lit’ or the old favourite ‘Psychological Thriller’ the three authors appearing together here certainly know a thing or two about the genre! Clare Mackintosh’s Let Me Lie finds a young woman struggling to come to terms with the apparent suicide of both her parents. Sarah Vaughan’s Anatomy of a Scandal centres on a high-profile marriage that begins to unravel when the husband is accused of a terrible crime. Fiona Cummins The Collector sees DS Etta Fitzroy hunt down a twisted, obsessive criminal.

Tickets: £9

Owen Mullen, Claire MacLeary & Angus McAllister, Glasgow Criminal Beginnings

21st Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  Mitchell Library

Three crime writers who started out life in Glasgow, but haven’t always chosen to set their work in the city come together to discuss the influence Glasgow has had on their books.

Three crime writers who started out life in Glasgow, but haven’t always chosen to set their work in the city come together to discuss the influence Glasgow has had on their books. Owen Mullen’s debut novel Games People Play was long-listed for the McIlvanney Prize and his latest And So It Began was a Sunday Times Crime Club Star Pick. Claire MacLeary’s Burnout is the sequel to her debut, Cross Purpose which was also long-listed for the McIlvanney Prize. Angus McAllister’s Close Quarters satirises the traditional and sentimental view of Glasgow’s tenement life and has been a huge success.

Tickets: £9

Walk “The Square Mile of Murder”

22nd Mar 2018  •  3:00PM – 5:00PM  •  Mitchell Library

Follow in the bloody footsteps of Jack House’s 1961 crime classic with this guided walk around the key locations of four celebrated murder cases

Follow in the bloody footsteps of Jack House’s 1961 crime classic with this guided walk around the key locations of four celebrated murder cases, all within a mile of Charing Cross. Madeline Smith and Oscar Slater may be better known than Jessie McLachlan and Dr Edward Pritchard, but the sensational trials of all four shocked Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow, and their stories are still told and debated even today. This walk will provide plenty of inspiration for aspiring crime writers.

Led by Ronnie Scott BA, M Phil, PhD, FSA from The University of Strathclyde.

Tickets: £9

Russell Findlay, Acid Attack

22nd Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  CCA

Russell Findlay spent decades taking on the most dangerous men in Scotland’s criminal underworld.

Russell Findlay spent decades taking on the most dangerous men in Scotland’s criminal underworld. Organised crime clans such as the Daniels, Lyons and McGoverns and figures such as Paul Ferris and Kevin ‘Gerbil’ Carroll were unmasked by Findlay and his col-leagues at the Sunday Mail and Scottish Sun. Two days before Christmas 2015, Findlay became the target of an unprecedented attack when William ‘Basil’ Burns came to the journalist’s home and hurled sulphuric acid in his face. Taking this botched hit as his starting point, Findlay unravels the identity of those suspected of hiring Burns, at the same time giving a unique insight into the criminal landscape of modern Scotland.

Tickets: £9

To find out more information about these events or any other and to book any events you can go to the website https://www.ayewrite.com/Pages/default.aspx
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There’s been a murder picks of the Aye Write book Festival , Glasgow post 1

Alex Gray & Leigh Russell, Crime is a Series Business

15th Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  University of Glasgow Chapel

Join these two best-selling crime writers for a fascinating discussion about their latest novels

Join these two best-selling crime writers for a fascinating discussion about their latest novels which are both the latest instalments in a long running series. Alex Gray is one of Scotland’s most popular crime writers and Only the Dead Can Tell is the latest adventure for DSI William Lorimer. Leigh Russell is the author of the internationally bestselling Geraldine Steel series of which Class Murder is the latest. The series has sold over a million copies worldwide.

Tickets: £9

Stuart David: Peacock’s Alibi

15th Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  University of Glasgow Chapel

Stuart David is a musician, songwriter and novelist.

Stuart David is a musician, songwriter and novelist. He co-founded the band Belle and Sebastian and went on to form Looper. He grew up in Alexandria, on the west coast of Scotland – a town memorably described as looking like ‘a town that’s helping the police with their inquiries’. He returns to chronicling the chaotic life and times of his favourite Glasgow chancer, Peacock Johnson, in his forthcoming novel, Peacock’s Alibi, described by the Independent as ‘Billy Connolly meets Inspector Clouseau’.

In Peacock’s Alibi, Peacock Johnson is excited about his next get-rich-quick scheme. He thinks it’s a surefire winner and has a friend interested in investing. Unfortunately, Peacock is also the main suspect for the murder of small-time crook Dougie Dowds. He has an alibi, but Detective Inspector McFadgen is not buying it. Under McFadgen’s constant surveillance, Peacock’s path to riches seems to be vanishing into the ether, and then things begin to seriously unravel . . .

The character of Peacock Johnson is based on some of the people Stuart grew up with in Alexandria and might also be familiar to readers of a certain Mr Ian Rankin…

‘Peacock and Bev are fantastic characters. Very excited to see them back’ – Graham Linehan

‘If Stuart David ever gives up the day job, pop music’s loss would be literature’s gain’ – The Times

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

Venue Information

All ages

This venue has wheelchair access and disabled toilet facilities

Simon Cox & Ragnar Jonasson The Reykjavik Connection

16th Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  Mitchell Library

Join us for an evening of Nordic Noir.

This session will explore Icelandic crime from two fascinating  perspectives – the chilling, poetic beauty of Ragnar Jonasson’s crime fiction and Simon Cox’s celebrated BBC News investigation into unsolved murders in the 1970s.

Spanning the icy streets of Reykjavik, the Icelandic highlands and cold, isolated fjords, The Darkness is the first novel in the new Hulda crime series from one of the most exciting names in Nordic Noir. The Reykjavik Confessions is a chilling journey of discovery into a dark corner of Icelandic history, and a riveting true-crime thriller.

Chris Brookmyre & Laura Lam, It’s Crime Jim, But Not As We Know It

17th Mar 2018  •  4:45PM – 5:45PM  •  Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

Join these two crime writers who are expanding the boundaries of the genre

Join these two crime writers who are expanding the boundaries of the genre… Places in the Darkness is set on a space station where hundreds of scientists and engi-neers work building a colony ship that will one day take humanity to the stars. When a mutilated body is found, investigator, Alice Blake, is sent from Earth and discovers a conspiracy that threatens not only her life, but the future of humanity itself. Shattered Minds features an ex-neuroscientist Carina, who has been damaged by working on a sinister brain-mapping project. She must kick her addictions, fight her demons and destroy her adversary – before it changes her and our society, forever.

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

Venue Information

All ages

This venue has wheelchair access and disabled toilet facilities

Stuart Kelly: The Minister and the Murderer

18th Mar 2018  •  6:30PM – 7:30PM  •  Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

Literary critic and author Stuart Kelly uses an infamous murder case to write a compelling history of the church in Scotland,

In 1969, James Nelson confessed to murder, served a prison sentence, then applied to be ordained as a minster in the church. The case split the church in two as the bible has a lot to say about murder. Literary critic and author Stuart Kelly uses the case of Nelson to write a compelling history of the church in Scotland, it is a book of soul-searching and speculation, deep thinking and fine writing. It is a knotty, riveting and mind-expanding investigation of truth and faith.

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

David Adam & Gordon Brown, Adventures in Intelligence

18th Mar 2018  •  1:15PM – 2:15PM  •  Mitchell Library

In The Genius Within, bestselling author David Adam explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works

What if you have more intelligence than you realize? What if there is a genius inside you, just waiting to be released? And what if the route to better brain power is not hard work or thousands of hours of practice but to simply swallow a pill? In The Genius Within, bestselling author David Adam explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works – to make it better, sharper, more focused and, yes, more intelligent. He will be chaired by the crime writer Gordon Brown, whose latest novel features a killer who has been programmed by just this kind of technology!

To find out more information about these events or any other and to book any events you can go to the website https://www.ayewrite.com/Pages/default.aspx

There’s been a murder author interview with Kaite Welsh

1. How did you get started writing?

I’ve always written and I’ve always wanted to be a writer – my dad has a contract he drew up when I was about seven, promising him 50% of my future royalties, so my family definitely believed in me. I’ve been reassured it has no legal standing though – sorry, Dad!

2. What drew you to write a novel

THE WAGES OF SIN is actually the fourth novel I’ve written – the first two will stay buried on my hard drive forever where they belong, but the third might be salvageable. I’ve always wanted to write a crime novel about the first female doctors and the plot was percolating in my brain for a few years before the opening paragraph came to me in one burst and I broke off whatever else I was doing to scribble it down and then didn’t stop.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

Wilkie Collins, definitely. I read THE WOMAN IN WHITE when I was about 14 and I try and revisit it every year or so. He captures all levels of Victorian society so perfectly, and his plots are so intricate but really worthwhile.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

I’ve been really lucky – my amazing agent, Laura Macdougall, approached me after reading the first two chapters on my website and worked with me for a year after she signed me to get it shipshape and ready to submit to publishers. Once we did, I got a couple of offers within the first week and Headline won me over with their incredibly enthusiastic response. I still have to pinch myself!

5. There are many interesting characters in your novel, do you have a particular favourite one?

Sarah is definitely my favourite – I spend so long in her head that she has to be. I love writing Merchiston, though. That sardonic, dry wit is exactly what I’d like to have in real life, although I think he would be terrifying as a lecturer! Elisabeth, Sarah’s friend and sidekick, is really lovely to write – she’s sweet and caring, but there’s a biting intelligence hiding under all that demure Victorian propriety.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your novel?

The best kind – pouring over books for hours at a time! Research just means reading the kind of stuff I love – I’m a total nerd for history, especially the history of medicine and women’s history.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

Not specifically, but I’ve found reading about the lives of female students in the 19th century incredibly inspiring – there are so many novels I could write about them!

8. How do you feel about being on being on the list for the not so booker prize

I didn’t realise I was! Funnily enough, although I’ve been on the other side of things as a prize judge I try not to engage too much with prizes or ‘best of’ lists – I think I’d just obsess about them. Individual responses from readers mean the most, and I’m lucky enough to have had some really wonderful ones.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

Sarah and I definitely have the same stubbornness! And we both have a best friend who’s willing to bail us out of trouble – or get right in it with us. I’ve yet to try and solve a murder, though…

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you might planned.

I’m just editing THE UNQUIET HEART, the second Sarah Gilchrist novel, at the moment – that should be out in August 2018. I’m also in the first draft of the third book in the series, THE FATE OF EMPIRES, which is due out in 2019. Beyond that, I’m busy with my journalism career and doodling ideas for a non-fiction book I really want to write…

11. If you had the opportunity to write a novel with any crime writer alive or dead, who would it be and why

Deanna Raybourn! Not only does she also write terrific historical mysteries, she’s an absolute hoot on social media – I have a suspicion that if we sat down together, though, we’d have too much fun talking (and drinking cocktails) to write!

12.  Do you have words of advice you can share with anyone who is interested in writing a novel

Stick at it! But write for you, not for anyone else. Especially with your first book, you get to write 100% what you want – there’ll be time for other people’s input later.

Sarah Gilchrist has fled London and a troubled past to join the University of Edinburgh’s medical school in 1892, the first year it admits women. She is determined to become a doctor despite the misgivings of her family and society, but Sarah quickly finds plenty of barriers at school itself: professors who refuse to teach their new pupils, male students determined to force out their female counterparts, and—perhaps worst of all—her female peers who will do anything to avoid being associated with a fallen woman.

Desperate for a proper education, Sarah turns to one of the city’s ramshackle charitable hospitals for additional training. The St Giles’ Infirmary for Women ministers to the downtrodden and drunk, the thieves and whores with nowhere else to go. In this environment, alongside a group of smart and tough teachers, Sarah gets quite an education. But when Lucy, one of Sarah’s patients, turns up in the university dissecting room as a battered corpse, Sarah finds herself drawn into a murky underworld of bribery, brothels, and body snatchers.

Painfully aware of just how little separates her own life from that of her former patient’s, Sarah is determined to find out what happened to Lucy and bring those responsible for her death to justice. But as she searches for answers in Edinburgh’s dank alleyways, bawdy houses and fight clubs, Sarah comes closer and closer to uncovering one of Edinburgh’s most lucrative trades, and, in doing so, puts her own life at risk…

Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/kaitewelshwriter

Twitter Page

@kaitewelsh

Subscribe to Kaite Welsh Newsletter

https://tinyletter.com/whatkaitedid

Amazon Author Page

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Kaite-Welsh/e/B018YIJP14/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

There’s been a murder author interview with Allan Watson


1. How did you get started writing?

I suffer from an extreme case of Emulation Syndrome. This means I have to mimic anything which grabs my attention. As an avid reader I was compelled to try my hand at writing. That one worked out quite well. However, not so much when I developed an interest in dairy farming and got arrested for cattle rustling.

2. What drew you to write a novel

I was writing a short story called ’Dreaming in the Snakepark’ and was buggered if I could think of a snappy ending, so I just kept going. A year later I was astounded to find I’d unintentionally written my first novel.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

I think every book you read influences what you write, although some have more of an impact than others. For me writers like Ray Bradbury, Iain Banks, John Irving, Alasdair Gray, Stephen King, Peter Straub, Phil Rickman and John Connolly are gifted with different styles of writing I use as a broad template to shape my own scribblings.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

Any new writer, unless they dress up as a giant cucumber with pink spots and a tutu, is always going to struggle to snag the attention of a publisher. A more effective method involves suitcases full of cash, cocaine and Russian prostitutes.

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novel, do you have a particular favourite one?

Heart Swarm features a dead tarantula called Steph. In this book she doesn’t do much apart from getting chucked out a window. However, I have big plans for Steph. I may use some pseudo-science to reanimate her, pump her full of spider steroids and then have her rampage through Glasgow biting the heads off innocent passers-by.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your Novel?

I’m pretty lazy when it comes to research. I did have a few pints in Cathedral House hotel to nail down the drinking scenes, then staggered around the Necropolis for a bit before falling asleep and getting sunburn. Further efforts at painstaking research involved seeing how many shop dummies I could fit into my chest freezer (one and a half) and hanging around Barlinnie prison until a burly bloke in a warden’s uniform told me to sod off or he’d call the police.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

This is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, places, events and incidents are either the products of the author’s imagination or used in a fictitious manner. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, or actual events is purely coincidental. (laughs up sleeve until red in the face and collapses in a heap on the carpet)

8. How do you feel about being on being on the list for the not so booker prize

I am? Wow, I feel excited beyond belief. Whooooo! (pumps fist in air three times) Hang on, you meant this question for someone else, didn’t you? Now I feel deflated and acutely embarrassed.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

You’re having a go about the drinking and the womanising aren’t you? No, don’t deny it. Just because Will Harlan enjoys a gin or two and schmoozes with loose women doesn’t mean it’s a reflection of my own lifestyle. As for the Granny porn? Don’t even go there. The only character trait we share is Harlan’s belief the world revolves around him and no one else.

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you might planned.

Right now, I’m putting the finishing touches to a book called ‘Wasp Latitudes’ which is the sequel to Heart Swarm. I’ve never written a follow on book before so it’s been an interesting experience, especially trying to gauge how much of the previous novel I need to refer back to. It sometimes annoys me in other books when characters undergo a life-changing and traumatic series of events and in the next book they carry on as if nothing happened. Life doesn’t work that way. Even fictional life.

11. If you had the opportunity to write a novel with any crime writer alive or dead, who would it be and why

I’d plump for JRR Tolkien whose first book was basically about burglary, so that technically makes him a crime writer. I loved Lord of the Rings, but I hated all those boring Elvish poems and sonnets. I’d have talked him into replacing those with contemporary lyrics of his time period – like ‘Hey Senorita’ by the Penguins or Doris Day’s ‘Secret Love’.

12. Do you have words of advice you can share with anyone who is intrested in writing a novel

Just go for it. There’s nothing wrong about having a God complex. But never let your mother read your finished work. It leads to highly awkward conversations about the misuse of loofahs.


Heart Swarm – Prepare to be Scared…

It feels like history is repeating itself when out-of-favour detective Will Harlan gets summoned to a crime scene in the village of Brackenbrae after a young girl is found hanging in the woods.
Five years ago Harlan headed up the investigation of an identical murder in the same woods; a mishandled investigation that effectively destroyed his credibility as a detective. The new case immediately takes a bizarre twist when the body is identified as the same girl found hanging in the woods five years ago.
The following day a local man commits suicide and the police find more dead girls hidden in his basement. The case seems open and closed.
Until the killing spree begins.
Harlan finds himself drawn into a dark world where murder is a form of self-expression and human life treated as one more commodity to be used and discarded.
The only clue that links everything is a large oil painting of ‘Sagittarius A’ – a massive black hole at the centre of the galaxy orbited by thirteen stars daube
Books

Dreaming in the Snakepark

Carapace

The Garden of Remembrance

1234

Monochrome

…And Other Stories

Mezzanine and Other Curiously Dark Tales

Heart Swarm

(As The Reverend Strachan McQuade) Invergallus
Amazon Author Page

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Allan-Watson/e/B007OWPNPY

The cost of living Blog Tour – Author Interview with Rachel Ward


Rachel Ward is a best-selling writer for young adults. Her first book, Numbers, was published in 2009 and shortlisted for the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize. An avid reader of detective fiction, The Cost of Living is her first book for adults. Rachel lives in Bath with her husband, and has two grown-up children.

1. How did you get started writing?

 I just started quietly one day, in my mid-thirties. I used to listen to the afternoon play on Radio 4 when I was driving to pick up my kids from school and I just wondered if I could write one, so I did. It was rubbish, alas, but it did get me started.

2. What drew you to write a novel?

 I tried plays and short stories first. A novel seemed a natural progression. I wanted to challenge myself, to see if I could do it. I wrote two novels which were rejected by every agent and publisher I sent them to. It was third time lucky with my YA novel, Numbers. The first publisher I sent it to snapped it up. The Cost of Living is my first novel for adults. I’m not sure why I’ve started something new – I think I’m just lead by the story and the characters that pop into my head. As soon as I started writing this one, I knew it wasn’t YA.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

 Hmm, that’s a very tricky question. I should think everything I’ve ever read has influenced me in one way or another. I don’t ever really think about my writing style. I know I’m not particularly literary and that my books are easy to read, but it’s not a conscious thing – it’s just how the words come out!

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

 Yes, I didn’t know any other writers, or anyone in publishing. This was pre-Twitter and Facebook, too, so it was more difficult to make contacts. To start with I used the Writers and Artists Yearbook and sent submissions off in the post. It’s quite dispiriting to have a succession of your own self-addressed envelopes plopping back onto your doormat each containing another rejection. In the end, I found my ‘in’ via the Frome Festival which has a strong writing thread. I booked an editorial one-to-one with Imogen Cooper, then the fiction editor at Chicken House, and the rest is history …

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novel, do you have a particular favourite one?

 I’m so fond of this set of characters. I absolutely love them and I love spending time with them. When I was writing the book, I had a couple of breaks due to domestic circumstances and it was so nice to pick up where I’d left off – it’s like spending time with friends. It too difficult to pick a favourite, although I love my main characters, Ant and Bea, very much and am very excited to see what might happen to them in the future.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your Novel?

 I’m the laziest person in the world when it comes to research. The beautiful thing about writing a book based in and around a supermarket is that every boring food shopping trip becomes research. I try to chat to the checkout workers to get useful bits of information and I like observing the other customers and what’s going on.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

 They are not specifically based on real life people but sometimes they are amalgams of people. I often make notes about people I see in real life or on TV, for future reference.

8. What made you decide to turn to writing crime novels?

 I’ve always read a lot of crime, but for the past two years, that’s pretty much all I’ve read. I don’t know why it took me so long to think of writing a crime novel myself, but once I’d found Bea, my main character, it was an absolute joy to write this sort of crime story, which, although contemporary and with a bit of a dark thread running through it, is on the cosy end of the scale.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa? 

I think it’s almost impossible to know how much of yourself you are putting into your characters. I’m quite calm, quite self-contained, which wouldn’t make for very good reading, I think. My characters are more sociable and more fun than me!

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you might planned.

 I’ve started writing a sequel to The Cost of Living. I’m about half way and have a title all ready. I’ve got three or four more Ant and Bea plots in my head, and I would love it if I got the chance to write them. Writing Ant and Bea stories is my current ‘happy place’.

11. If you had the opportunity to write a novel with any crime writer alive or dead, who would it be and why?

 I’m a huge Henning Mankell fan and was terribly upset when he died in 2015. I would have liked to have seen him in real life, although I probably would have been too shy to talk to him, let alone write with him. There are lots of living writers that I admire. I love Ann Cleeves’ characters and the worlds she creates, and so it would be a joy to write with, and learn from, her.

12. Do you have words of advice you can share with anyone who is interested in writing a novel? 

Write what you would like to read. Write what makes you happy or fulfils some sort of need in you. Make notes of plot ideas, or observations as you go about your daily business. I used to keep a notebook to hand, but now I jot down notes on my phone. Try reading your work out loud (to an empty room, or an obliging cat or dog – I’ve got a long-suffering collie cross). It really helps to locate problem areas in your text and things that need fixing.


 When a young woman is attacked walking home from her local supermarket, Bea Jordan, a smart but unfulfilled checkout girl, is determined to investigate. Colleagues and customers become suspects, secrets are uncovered. While fear stalks the town, Bea finds an unlikely ally in Ant, the seemingly gormless new trainee, but risks losing the people she loves most as death comes close to home. The Cost of Living is a warm, contemporary story with likeable leads, an engaging cast of supporting characters and a dark thread running throughout.

Rachel Ward Novels

Numbers

The Chaos (Numbers #2)

Infinity (Numbers #3)

The Drowning

Water Born (The Drowning #2)

Twitter https://twitter.com/RachelWardbooks

Website http://www.rachelwardbooks.com/

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/347385.Rachel_Ward?from_search=true

Sandstone Press Website http://sandstonepress.com/books/the-cost-of-living

Amazon Author Page https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rachel-Ward/e/B001JS5XBI/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_book_1

The Cost of Living Blog Tour

 

 

There’s Been a Murder Pick of the Edinburgh Book Festival Sunday 27th August 2017 – Monday 28th August 2017

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Sunday 27th August

 

Michael J Malone & Agnes Ravatn

 Sun 27 Aug 5:00pm – 6:00pm

 Writers’ Retreat

 £8.00, £6.00

MYSTERIOUS STRANGERS

Dark secrets and past sins link the latest novels by Scotland’s Michael J Malone and Norway’s Agnes Ravatn. In Malone’s A Suitable Lie, a widowed father finds love again, but his new bride may not be all she seems. Ravatn’s The Bird Tribunal sees a woman exiled to an isolated fjord. There she begins an obsessive relationship with a curious stranger. Two compelling psychological dramas.

https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/michael-j-malone-agnes-ravatn-10253

Jon McGregor

 Sun 27 Aug 8:30pm – 9:30pm

 Baillie Gifford Corner Theatre

 £8.00, £6.00

MISSING PERSONS

Jon McGregor, author of If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things, brings us his first novel in 7 years: the story of lives haunted by a family’s loss, unfolding over the course of 13 years in a small village. Join McGregor on a journey through the landscapes, sounds and hidden stories of Reservoir 13. If you have a smartphone or tablet, bring it along with you fully charged and ready to use.

https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/jon-mcgregor-2-10251

 

Monday 28th August

J P Delaney & Caite Dolan-Leach

 Mon 28 Aug 8:30pm – 9:30pm

 Baillie Gifford Corner Theatre

 £8.00, £6.00

RED HOT THRILLERS

We’re bowing out with two of the year’s hottest and most hyped thrillers. J P Delaney has sold the rights to The Girl Before to 35 countries and Hollywood director Ron Howard looks set to make the movie. Caite Dolan-Leach’s smart and shocking debut Dead Letters, about two twins on a macabre hide and seek quest, was also snapped up for a large sum. Meet the novelists tipped to be the next big thing.

Vote for Dead Letters by Caite Dolan-Leach in the First Book Award.

https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/j-p-delaney-caite-dolan-leach

https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/the-festival/whats-on/michel-bussi-arne-dahl-10208

For more information about these and other events going on you can check out the Edinburgh International Book Festival at https://www.edbookfest.co.uk/, Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/edbookfest/, Twitter page at https://twitter.com/edbookfest/ or Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/edbookfest/