Emma Salisbury Absent Blog Tour

Emma writes gritty, crime fiction that focuses on the ‘why’dunnit as well as the ‘who’. She has worked for a housing association supporting ex-offenders into work which provided her with a lot of inspiration. Her novels have regularly been in the top ten Hardboiled chart and this summer she was awarded an Amazon All-Star bonus for being one of their most read authors.

Fans of Happy Valley and Scott and Bailey style police procedurals should try my Manchester detective series.

If you like hard-boiled crime writers Stuart MacBride, Denise Mina AND Ed James then my Scottish crime series is for you. Like living on the edge? Why not try both…

ONE BAD TURN is the third in the Salford detective series. No sooner has Detective Sergeant Kevin Coupland stepped off the plane from a family holiday than he gets the call that a woman’s body has been found on a path beside a recreation park in a smart suburb in Salford. Account Manager Sharon Mathers suffered a brutal blow to the head following a night out with friends from work. As the body count rises Coupland makes a startling discovery – the killings are linked to a murder in ’92. Coupland was a probationer back in the nineties – could he be linked in some way to the killer?

A PLACE OF SAFETY is the second in the Salford crime series and opens with a drive-by shooting that leaves a witness in fear for her life. DS Coupland and Moreton return to investigate what looks like a turf war gone wrong when a local gang does everything it can to cover the killer’s tracks. Why is a young woman who happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time such a threat to them? Or as Coupland suspects, is there more to their guilt than meets the eye?

FRAGILE CORD is the first in the Salford Detective series, introducing readers to overworked and under appreciated Detective Sergeant Kevin Coupland as he investigates the murder-suicide of a mother and her son. With over 100,000 copies downloaded it is riding high in the hardboiled bestseller charts, reaching no.2.

Edinburgh crime series featuring Davy Johnson:

THE SILENCE BEFORE THE SCREAM

When the daughter of Edinburgh’s most powerful crime lord is kidnapped all hell breaks loose in the city. Determined to find her without the hindrance of the police Gus McEwan summons his most reliable men to track her down. Davy Johnson, still reeling from witnessing an horrific suicide is in no position to refuse. As the violence escalates but no ransom note emerges Davy must convince Edinburgh’s most fearsome gangsters that this isn’t about money or power, but something far more primitive.

TRUTH LIES WAITING, the first in the Scottish crime fiction series introduces anti-hero Davy Johnson as his life is thrown into turmoil when a killer strikes in Edinburgh’s underbelly – framing him in the process. TRUTH LIES WAITING will tackle your perception of good v. evil forever.

Fans of Ed James, Stuart Macbride and Ian Rankin will be gripped by the rollercoaster ride through Edinburgh’s colourful underbelly.

Most evenings she can be found walking the family dog on the beach near our home in East Lothian, Scotland. You can find out more on my website http://www.emmasalisbury.com and she can be found on twitter @emmasauthor

What was the inspiration for her new book, how she got started writing it and what influenced her to write it.

ABSENT was usual in that it has been the only novel I’ve written where I had the title at the outset. I wanted to write about someone not there – and wondered what would make them be considered to be missing? I wanted to get my facts right, so my initial research involved finding out the legal definition of missing – and in doing so discovered that there is actually a police description for absent too – so I felt it was fate – that the title had legs, so to speak.

The story starts with a young couple moving into a flat together. They are in the process of carrying in packing boxes when they make a gruesome discovery – a child’s body in a bag. What is disturbing is that no one has reported them missing, so Coupland sets about trying to find how this could happen.  This set me on another path of research – how it was possible for children to be unaccounted for – and I came upon human trafficking. I hadn’t intended the story to become caught up in it in any way, but the more I learned the more I felt it made valid reading, and sometimes weaving the facts around fiction can get information across in a way political statements cannot.

I find my stories grow organically; one scene leads into another, possibly quite different direction but still with a common theme – in this case – who was the child, and who was responsible for leaving them there? Maybe on some subliminal level I had been influenced by the TV news reporting, but I certainly didn’t feel at the outset that was the story I wanted to tell. For me it’s always about the personal stories, the individuals  – and the victims – who often become more present in their death than when they were alive.

Interwoven with the case is the continuing drama of Coupland’s personal life which I know had readers on tenterhooks at the end of book three (no spoilers here!). Suffice to say he is very angry at the start of this novel, and because of that doesn’t always make the best choices.

The over-riding themes in this book are how people can go missing without anyone noticing, loss in its many forms, and hope.

When he stopped a serial killer in his tracks earlier in the year he thought that would be the end of it, but for DS Kevin Coupland his nightmare has just begun.

A child’s body is discovered hidden in a bag, kicking off a major investigation for Salford Precinct’s murder squad. Soon the National Crime Agency roll into town and Coupland is under strict instructions to play nice.

He’s got enough on his plate to worry about politics. A shock discovery in his personal life is starting to take its toll, causing him to make decisions that bring him to the attention of the powers that be for all the wrong reasons.

DS Alex Moreton returns from maternity leave to find her partner deeply troubled, but with a cold case to review she’s in no position to prevent him hitting the self-destruct button.

As he hunts down the child’s killer Coupland is forced to reflect upon his own life and find an answer to the question he’s been avoiding. Is it possible to accept the things you cannot change?

***** 5 STARS

Emma Salisbury’s Absent is the fourth novel in the Salford crime series and it’s a real treat for the reader, even though it’s part of a series of novel it also can be read as a stand-alone and you don’t feel lost, though you will want to go back and read the series from the start if you haven’t done so, Emma Salisbury is a exciting new talent in the crime fiction genre, she knows how to keep a reader glued from page one to right through to the final pages, her plots take you on a roller coaster ride of ups and down of emotions and thrilling storyline and her new novel is no different. She identifies with her characters and they are so believable you would really think that they were real everyday people to you would know, the way she plots a storyline is also what mKe the book so believable as she knows how to draw the audience in and then right when you think know where it is going, a twist is thrown in and you know that you wouldn’t’t be putting the book down until you have finished the last page. The setting is also so believable that you feel that you are following along with the characters you can picture yourself right along side the characters, this is definitely a author watch who is definitely going places, she also has author exciting series of crime novels to lose yourself in, this time set in Scotland. I encourage you to buy this book you won’t be disappointed.

AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Emma-Salisbury/e/B00KY71FFS

ABSENT AMAZON BOOK PAGE

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Alison Baillie A Fractured Winter Blog Tour

ALISON BAILLIE was brought up in Ilkley, Yorkshire by Scottish parents. She studied English at the University of St Andrews, before teaching English in Edinburgh secondary schools and EFL in Finland and Switzerland. Now she spends her time reading, writing, travelling, spending time with her grandchildren and attending crime writing festivals.

Story Behind A Fractured Winter

A Fractured Winter originally grew out of my interest in the way our personalities are formed by our past experiences and, in the book, the happiness of the main character, Olivia, a young Scottish mother leading a seemingly idyllic family life in Switzerland, is threatened when the echoes of the past come back to haunt her.

Although it is by no means autobiographical, the book is based on places I know and some of my life experiences. Fortunately, I do not have the emotional childhood scars Olivia has or go through the traumatic events that take place in the book.

Olivia lives in a small village called Wildenwil, which you will not find on the map of Switzerland, although in my imagination it is situated next to the real town of Zug. Wildenwil is a composite of small towns I’ve known, serving a farming community, with the primary school and shop the centre of village life and the most exciting thing that happens a dance organised by the gym group. Zug, on the other hand, has a large expat community because of its tax system, and in the book the traditional village is being changed by incomers.

The books opens when Sandra, Olivia’s daughter’s best friend, disappears on her way home from school and Olivia gets an anonymous note, which suggests that somebody knows her secret – the reason she had to leave Scotland. These two events threaten her family and her sanity as the book describes the search for Sandra and Olivia being confronted with her past life.

There are also sections of the book set in Scarborough, a seaside town in the north of England, where Marie, a lonely schoolgirl lives with her Scottish parents. I also lived in Scarborough when I was very young, with Scottish parents, and the flat where Marie lives, opposite beautiful Peasholm Park, is based on the one we had. We lived above the pharmacy where my father worked, but the shop is now a betting shop, as it is in the book. However, that is where the similarity ends and I’m happy to say my life and parents were nothing like Marie’s.

There is another section involving Lucy, a student at the university of St Andrews who later becomes a teacher in Portobello, the seaside suburb of Edinburgh. Once again, this is a path I followed, although our experiences were very different I’m relieved to say! However, I’ve used actual houses, flats and rooms as the backdrop for imaginary incidents.

Throughout the book, my original idea of showing the way our lives are inextricably formed by our past experiences is woven into settings I know, using the classic idea of ‘what if?’ As I wrote it, the characters became as real to me as the settings and I hope that the result is one that people can identify with and believe in.

A missing girl.

Threatening notes.

Sinister strangers.

Olivia’s idyllic family life in a Swiss mountain village is falling apart. She thought she’d managed to escape the past, but it’s coming back to haunt her.

Has somebody discovered her secret – why she had to leave Scotland more than ten years ago?

What is her connection to Marie, a lonely schoolgirl in a Yorkshire seaside town, and Lucy, a student at a Scottish university?

A story of the shadows of the past, the uncertainties of the present and how you can never really know anybody.

*****5 STAR

A Fractured Winter is one of those great crime novels that you just have to read a book full of mystery and suspense that takes you on a roller coaster of emotions and thrills. It was packed full of interesting characters that you could believe were actually real people that you know instead of fictional characters in a novel, another thing which makes this a brilliant novel is the way in which the author writes an out the places the character visit and the different settings of Edinburgh and Switzerland, you actually feel as though you were there in the action with the characters as you read along. For new reader of Alison Baillies work then you have picked a great novel to introduce yourself to this great author and lives up to the promotion declaring this is anew crime noir author to look out for. If your like me and you have followed Alison since she brought out the brilliant first novel Sewing the Shadows Together a few years ago then you are still in for a treat and even though the setting has changed from based in Scotland to based in Switzerland with a back story in Edinburgh, the quality of writing is still the same and you can definitely tell that Alison was a English Major and Teacher. I highly recommend that you buy this book and the previous if you haven’t already and I look forward to reading more of her work in due course.

Amazon Author Page

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Alison-Baillie/e/B014ID2SG8/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

A Fractured Winter Amazon Page

Tony Black Her Cold Eyes Blog Tour

Tony Black is the author of 15 novels, most recently Her Cold Eyes and the Bay of Martyrs. He has been nominated for seven CWA Daggers and was runner up in The Guardian’s Not the Booker prize for The Last Tiger.

He has written three crime series, a number of crime novellas and a collection of short stories.

For more information, and the latest news visit his website at: http://www.tonyblack.net or his blog: http://www.pulppusher.blogspot.com

STORY BEHIND HER COLD EYES

Untangling a crime writer’s motives, and motivation, can be a bit like unravelling an elastic-band ball. You know there has to be something in there but you’ve no idea what. And then there’s the sneaky suspicion that, really, it might just be more elastic bands.

HER COLD EYES was a tricky book to write. I came to it off the back of a busy year where I’d completed two novels. I had a vague notion of where I might like to take my protagonist, DCI Bob Valentine, but nothing concrete and certainly nothing resembling an actual plot.

I normally plan my books in detail. There’ll be an A4 notepad full of rough ideas, then a more cogent plan evolves. Finally, I’ll draft a detailed synopsis and a chapter map. So, I know where I’m going. I’ve strayed from this route a couple of times in the past, but not for crime novels that tend to be more exacting than my non-crime stuff.

HER COLD EYES started with a vague notion. I had an idea of a young girl who’s running away from someone and dies in an horrific dash across a dark road. That was about it. I stumbled into some research about pizzagate – the Washington DC paedophile ring allegations that surfaced in 2017 – and from there I was away to the races.

I delved deeper into the pretty sordid subject of political paedophile rings and found myself reading up on the Westminster scandal. At first glance, I found it all a little fanciful; I’ve never been one for conspiracy theories and it all sounded a little too grassy knoll for my liking. But slowly, the coincidences began to mount to such an extent that they didn’t look like coincidences at all.

One infamous case known as the Dickens dossier set so many alarm bells ringing I thought there could be little doubting the existence of such evil sects. However it still took a hefty suspension of disbelief to convince me household names in Parliament could be involved. That changed when I started looking at victims’ statements.

There’s a lot of first-hand evidence available online, some of it in the form of video testimony. As I type this, I can still see the teary eyes and croaky voice on one young girl who was used as ‘a breeder’ for Satanic rituals in which her offspring were sacrificed. She miscarried one of her children and kept its corpse in her room, where she built a little shrine where she placed flowers until it was discovered.

It would take a harder heart than mine to say that young girl was lying. And she was by no means alone. I wanted to tell a story that showed what those girls had been through. The unadorned facts I’d uncovered composed the foundations of HER COLD EYES, but really, it’s not a story you could make up.

Abbie is missing, and her mother knows exactly who is to blame.

But nobody is listening.

When the case falls to DCI Bob Valentine he has no choice but to listen. Troubled by visions of a young girl’s desperate anguish and her mother’s heartbreak, Valentine soon finds himself immersed in the most harrowing investigation of his police career.

It’s an investigation that leads him and his closest colleagues to uncover ritualistic practices inextricably linked to the highest echelons of society.  As the extent of the abuse, sacrifice and torture becomes clear, how can the police hope to protect the victims from their terrible fate? And how can they trap the guilty when to do so will bring down so many of those in power?

The bloodthirsty reality of Satanic ritual and his battles with those who would silence him take Valentine to a dark place where his world view is shattered, perhaps forever.

***** 5 Stars

Her cold eyes is a dark, very gritty and atmospheric, the latest in a can’t put down book from crime author Tony Black. From start to finish this books takes you on a harrowing journey as you follow the story of the female character, missing teenager 15 year old Abbie McGarvie, the novel has scenes from 2009, 2011, 2015 and 2016 telling her backstory until a youngsters body is found that has died in a car accident, is found naked except for a white tennis show but horrifically shows signs of being abused and was pregnant. It is up to DI Bob Valentine and his team to crack the case that lead them to a paedophile ring in the corridors of power mixed in with a sadistic cult and you have the making of a very intense novel that you can’t put down and will give you goosebumps from start to finish.

Amazon Author Page

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Tony-Black/e/B003VMUM16

Her cold Eyes Amazon Page

Black and White Publishing Page

http://blackandwhitepublishing.com/authors/b/tony-black.html

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Fun Lovin’ Crimewriters

23rd Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 9:45PM  •  Tramway

Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers is a full-on rock ‘n’ roll experience, featuring a set list of carefully chosen cover versions that have a distinctly criminal flavour…

It started at The House of Blues in New Orleans where Mark Billingham, Stuart Neville and Doug Johnstone had a drunken idea…Fast forward a year and they have teamed up with crime-writing pals Val McDermid, Luca Veste and Chris Brookmyre to form a band – Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers – a full-on rock ‘n’ roll experience, featuring a set list of carefully chosen cover versions that have a distinctly criminal flavour… You’re in for a real treat as songs by The Beatles, Talking Heads, Elvis Costello, The Clash and Scotland’s own The Proclaimers are given the Fun Lovin’ Crime Writers treatment.

Tickets: £12

Lin Anderson Introduces… CJ Tudor, Karen Hamilton & Cara Hunter

24th Mar 2018  •  11:30AM – 12:30PM  •  Mitchell Library

The popular crime writer and founder of the Bloody Scotland crime festival, Lin Anderson will be here to introduce: C. J. Tudor and Cara Hunter

The popular crime writer and founder of the Bloody Scotland crime festival, Lin Anderson will be here to introduce: C. J. Tudor has had a variety of jobs including trainee reporter, waitress, voiceover artist and television presenter The Chalk Man is her first novel. Karen Hamilton spent her childhood in Angola, Zimbabwe, Belgium and Italy and worked as a flight attendant for many years The Perfect Girlfriend is her first novel. Cara Hunter lives in Oxford, in a street not unlike that one featured in Close to Home, her debut featuring DI Adam Fawley.

Tickets: £6

Lindsey Davis, Pandora’s Boy

24th Mar 2018  •  1:15PM – 2:15PM  •  Mitchell Library

Lindsey Davis has written nearly thirty novels. Pandora’s Boy is the latest to feature Private investigator Flavia Albia

Lindsey Davis has written nearly thirty novels. There are twenty books in her bestselling mystery series features laid-back First Century detective Marcus Didius Falco. Pandora’s Boy is the latest to feature Private investigator Flavia Albia. Her books are translated into many languages and serialised on BBC Radio 4. a past Chair of the Crimewriters’ Association and The Society of Authors, she has won the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, the Dagger in the Library, and a Sherlock award for Falco as Best Comic Detective, plus international awards such as the Premio Colosseo ‘For enhancing the image of Rome’.

Tickets: £9

Alan Parks, Ian Skewis & Charles E. McGarry, The Glasgow (Crime) Boys

24th Mar 2018  •  1:15PM – 2:15PM  •  Mitchell Library

Join three relatively new names on the Glasgow crime writing scene as they discuss their novels.

Join three relatively new names on the Glasgow crime writing scene as they discuss their novels. Bloody January by Alan Parks brings to life the dark underbelly of 1970s Glasgow and introduces a dark and electrifying new voice in Scottish noir, in A Murder Of Crows by Ian Skewis DCI Jack Russell is flung headlong into a race against time to prevent the evolution of a serial killer and The Ghost of Helen Addison by Charles E. McGarry, sees private detective, avowed gourmet and wine connoisseur, Leo Moran drawn into the investigation of the ritualistic murder of a young woman in rural Argyll

Tickets: £6

Val McDermid, Doug Johnstone & Lin Anderson, Bloody Scotland

24th Mar 2018  •  3:00PM – 4:00PM  •  Mitchell Library

Join three of the contributors to this unique anthology Val McDermid, Doug Johnstone and Lin Anderson and the editor James Crawford as they explore the thrilling potential of Scotland’s iconic sites and structures.

In this unique anthology twelve of Scotland’s best crime writers use the sinister side of the country’s built heritage in stories that are by turns gripping, chilling and redemptive. Join Val McDermid, Doug Johnstone and Lin Anderson and the editor James Crawford as they explore the thrilling potential of Scotland’s iconic sites and structures. From murder in an Iron Age broch and a macabre tale of revenge among the furious clamour of an eighteenth century mill, to a rivalry turning fatal in the concrete galleries of the seminary at Cardross, this collection uncovers the intimate – and deadly – connections between people and places.

Tickets: £9

Shaun Greenhalgh & Waldemar Januszczak, A Forger’s Tale

24th Mar 2018  •  6:30PM – 7:30PM  •  Mitchell Library

In 2007, Shaun Greenhalgh was sentenced to four years and eight months in prison for the crime of producing artistic forgeries

In 2007, Shaun Greenhalgh was sentenced to four years and eight months in prison for the crime of producing artistic forgeries. Working out of a shed in his parents’ garden, Greenhalgh had successfully fooled some of the world’s greatest museums. Written in prison, A Forger’s Tale details Shaun’s notorious career and the extraordinary circumstances that led to it. From Leonardo drawings to L.S. Lowry paintings, from busts of American presidents to Anglo-Saxon brooches, Greenhalgh could – and did – copy it all. Shaun will be in conversation with Waldemar Januszczak, the renowned art critic and broadcaster who contributed to the book.

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Nick Triplow: Getting Carter

20th Mar 2018  •  7:00PM – 8:00PM  •  Glasgow Film Theatre

Getting Carter is a meticulously researched and riveting account of the career of a doomed genius. The talk will be followed by a screening of the 1971 classic film.

The film Get Carter was based on a book called Jack’s Return Home by Ted Lewis. The influence of both book and film is strong to this day, but what of the man who wrote this seminal work? Born in Manchester in 1940, he grew up in postwar Humberside, attending Hull Art School before heading for London. His life, a cycle of obscurity to glamour and back to obscurity. He had eight books published but, his life fell apart, his marriage ended, he returned to Humberside and died aged only 42. Getting Carter is a meticulously researched and riveting account of the career of a doomed genius. The talk will be followed by a screening of the 1971 classic film.

Tickets: £10

Clare Mackintosh, Sarah Vaughan & Fiona Cummins: Unputdownable Thrillers

21st Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  Mitchell Library

Whether you call them, ‘Domestic noir’ or ‘Grip-lit’ or the old favourite ‘Psychological Thriller’ the three authors appearing together here certainly know a thing or two about the genre!

The past few years has seen the unstoppable rise of a certain kind of crime novel, whether you call them, ‘Domestic noir’ or ‘Grip-lit’ or the old favourite ‘Psychological Thriller’ the three authors appearing together here certainly know a thing or two about the genre! Clare Mackintosh’s Let Me Lie finds a young woman struggling to come to terms with the apparent suicide of both her parents. Sarah Vaughan’s Anatomy of a Scandal centres on a high-profile marriage that begins to unravel when the husband is accused of a terrible crime. Fiona Cummins The Collector sees DS Etta Fitzroy hunt down a twisted, obsessive criminal.

Tickets: £9

Owen Mullen, Claire MacLeary & Angus McAllister, Glasgow Criminal Beginnings

21st Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  Mitchell Library

Three crime writers who started out life in Glasgow, but haven’t always chosen to set their work in the city come together to discuss the influence Glasgow has had on their books.

Three crime writers who started out life in Glasgow, but haven’t always chosen to set their work in the city come together to discuss the influence Glasgow has had on their books. Owen Mullen’s debut novel Games People Play was long-listed for the McIlvanney Prize and his latest And So It Began was a Sunday Times Crime Club Star Pick. Claire MacLeary’s Burnout is the sequel to her debut, Cross Purpose which was also long-listed for the McIlvanney Prize. Angus McAllister’s Close Quarters satirises the traditional and sentimental view of Glasgow’s tenement life and has been a huge success.

Tickets: £9

Walk “The Square Mile of Murder”

22nd Mar 2018  •  3:00PM – 5:00PM  •  Mitchell Library

Follow in the bloody footsteps of Jack House’s 1961 crime classic with this guided walk around the key locations of four celebrated murder cases

Follow in the bloody footsteps of Jack House’s 1961 crime classic with this guided walk around the key locations of four celebrated murder cases, all within a mile of Charing Cross. Madeline Smith and Oscar Slater may be better known than Jessie McLachlan and Dr Edward Pritchard, but the sensational trials of all four shocked Victorian and Edwardian Glasgow, and their stories are still told and debated even today. This walk will provide plenty of inspiration for aspiring crime writers.

Led by Ronnie Scott BA, M Phil, PhD, FSA from The University of Strathclyde.

Tickets: £9

Russell Findlay, Acid Attack

22nd Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  CCA

Russell Findlay spent decades taking on the most dangerous men in Scotland’s criminal underworld.

Russell Findlay spent decades taking on the most dangerous men in Scotland’s criminal underworld. Organised crime clans such as the Daniels, Lyons and McGoverns and figures such as Paul Ferris and Kevin ‘Gerbil’ Carroll were unmasked by Findlay and his col-leagues at the Sunday Mail and Scottish Sun. Two days before Christmas 2015, Findlay became the target of an unprecedented attack when William ‘Basil’ Burns came to the journalist’s home and hurled sulphuric acid in his face. Taking this botched hit as his starting point, Findlay unravels the identity of those suspected of hiring Burns, at the same time giving a unique insight into the criminal landscape of modern Scotland.

Tickets: £9

To find out more information about these events or any other and to book any events you can go to the website https://www.ayewrite.com/Pages/default.aspx

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Alex Gray & Leigh Russell, Crime is a Series Business

15th Mar 2018  •  6:00PM – 7:00PM  •  University of Glasgow Chapel

Join these two best-selling crime writers for a fascinating discussion about their latest novels

Join these two best-selling crime writers for a fascinating discussion about their latest novels which are both the latest instalments in a long running series. Alex Gray is one of Scotland’s most popular crime writers and Only the Dead Can Tell is the latest adventure for DSI William Lorimer. Leigh Russell is the author of the internationally bestselling Geraldine Steel series of which Class Murder is the latest. The series has sold over a million copies worldwide.

Tickets: £9

Stuart David: Peacock’s Alibi

15th Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  University of Glasgow Chapel

Stuart David is a musician, songwriter and novelist.

Stuart David is a musician, songwriter and novelist. He co-founded the band Belle and Sebastian and went on to form Looper. He grew up in Alexandria, on the west coast of Scotland – a town memorably described as looking like ‘a town that’s helping the police with their inquiries’. He returns to chronicling the chaotic life and times of his favourite Glasgow chancer, Peacock Johnson, in his forthcoming novel, Peacock’s Alibi, described by the Independent as ‘Billy Connolly meets Inspector Clouseau’.

In Peacock’s Alibi, Peacock Johnson is excited about his next get-rich-quick scheme. He thinks it’s a surefire winner and has a friend interested in investing. Unfortunately, Peacock is also the main suspect for the murder of small-time crook Dougie Dowds. He has an alibi, but Detective Inspector McFadgen is not buying it. Under McFadgen’s constant surveillance, Peacock’s path to riches seems to be vanishing into the ether, and then things begin to seriously unravel . . .

The character of Peacock Johnson is based on some of the people Stuart grew up with in Alexandria and might also be familiar to readers of a certain Mr Ian Rankin…

‘Peacock and Bev are fantastic characters. Very excited to see them back’ – Graham Linehan

‘If Stuart David ever gives up the day job, pop music’s loss would be literature’s gain’ – The Times

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

Venue Information

All ages

This venue has wheelchair access and disabled toilet facilities

Simon Cox & Ragnar Jonasson The Reykjavik Connection

16th Mar 2018  •  7:45PM – 8:45PM  •  Mitchell Library

Join us for an evening of Nordic Noir.

This session will explore Icelandic crime from two fascinating  perspectives – the chilling, poetic beauty of Ragnar Jonasson’s crime fiction and Simon Cox’s celebrated BBC News investigation into unsolved murders in the 1970s.

Spanning the icy streets of Reykjavik, the Icelandic highlands and cold, isolated fjords, The Darkness is the first novel in the new Hulda crime series from one of the most exciting names in Nordic Noir. The Reykjavik Confessions is a chilling journey of discovery into a dark corner of Icelandic history, and a riveting true-crime thriller.

Chris Brookmyre & Laura Lam, It’s Crime Jim, But Not As We Know It

17th Mar 2018  •  4:45PM – 5:45PM  •  Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

Join these two crime writers who are expanding the boundaries of the genre

Join these two crime writers who are expanding the boundaries of the genre… Places in the Darkness is set on a space station where hundreds of scientists and engi-neers work building a colony ship that will one day take humanity to the stars. When a mutilated body is found, investigator, Alice Blake, is sent from Earth and discovers a conspiracy that threatens not only her life, but the future of humanity itself. Shattered Minds features an ex-neuroscientist Carina, who has been damaged by working on a sinister brain-mapping project. She must kick her addictions, fight her demons and destroy her adversary – before it changes her and our society, forever.

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

Venue Information

All ages

This venue has wheelchair access and disabled toilet facilities

Stuart Kelly: The Minister and the Murderer

18th Mar 2018  •  6:30PM – 7:30PM  •  Glasgow Royal Concert Hall

Literary critic and author Stuart Kelly uses an infamous murder case to write a compelling history of the church in Scotland,

In 1969, James Nelson confessed to murder, served a prison sentence, then applied to be ordained as a minster in the church. The case split the church in two as the bible has a lot to say about murder. Literary critic and author Stuart Kelly uses the case of Nelson to write a compelling history of the church in Scotland, it is a book of soul-searching and speculation, deep thinking and fine writing. It is a knotty, riveting and mind-expanding investigation of truth and faith.

Tickets: £9

BOOK NOW

Or buy tickets from our box office on 0141 353 8000

David Adam & Gordon Brown, Adventures in Intelligence

18th Mar 2018  •  1:15PM – 2:15PM  •  Mitchell Library

In The Genius Within, bestselling author David Adam explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works

What if you have more intelligence than you realize? What if there is a genius inside you, just waiting to be released? And what if the route to better brain power is not hard work or thousands of hours of practice but to simply swallow a pill? In The Genius Within, bestselling author David Adam explores the ground-breaking neuroscience of cognitive enhancement that is changing the way the brain and the mind works – to make it better, sharper, more focused and, yes, more intelligent. He will be chaired by the crime writer Gordon Brown, whose latest novel features a killer who has been programmed by just this kind of technology!

To find out more information about these events or any other and to book any events you can go to the website https://www.ayewrite.com/Pages/default.aspx

There’s been a murder author interview with Kaite Welsh

1. How did you get started writing?

I’ve always written and I’ve always wanted to be a writer – my dad has a contract he drew up when I was about seven, promising him 50% of my future royalties, so my family definitely believed in me. I’ve been reassured it has no legal standing though – sorry, Dad!

2. What drew you to write a novel

THE WAGES OF SIN is actually the fourth novel I’ve written – the first two will stay buried on my hard drive forever where they belong, but the third might be salvageable. I’ve always wanted to write a crime novel about the first female doctors and the plot was percolating in my brain for a few years before the opening paragraph came to me in one burst and I broke off whatever else I was doing to scribble it down and then didn’t stop.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

Wilkie Collins, definitely. I read THE WOMAN IN WHITE when I was about 14 and I try and revisit it every year or so. He captures all levels of Victorian society so perfectly, and his plots are so intricate but really worthwhile.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

I’ve been really lucky – my amazing agent, Laura Macdougall, approached me after reading the first two chapters on my website and worked with me for a year after she signed me to get it shipshape and ready to submit to publishers. Once we did, I got a couple of offers within the first week and Headline won me over with their incredibly enthusiastic response. I still have to pinch myself!

5. There are many interesting characters in your novel, do you have a particular favourite one?

Sarah is definitely my favourite – I spend so long in her head that she has to be. I love writing Merchiston, though. That sardonic, dry wit is exactly what I’d like to have in real life, although I think he would be terrifying as a lecturer! Elisabeth, Sarah’s friend and sidekick, is really lovely to write – she’s sweet and caring, but there’s a biting intelligence hiding under all that demure Victorian propriety.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your novel?

The best kind – pouring over books for hours at a time! Research just means reading the kind of stuff I love – I’m a total nerd for history, especially the history of medicine and women’s history.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

Not specifically, but I’ve found reading about the lives of female students in the 19th century incredibly inspiring – there are so many novels I could write about them!

8. How do you feel about being on being on the list for the not so booker prize

I didn’t realise I was! Funnily enough, although I’ve been on the other side of things as a prize judge I try not to engage too much with prizes or ‘best of’ lists – I think I’d just obsess about them. Individual responses from readers mean the most, and I’m lucky enough to have had some really wonderful ones.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

Sarah and I definitely have the same stubbornness! And we both have a best friend who’s willing to bail us out of trouble – or get right in it with us. I’ve yet to try and solve a murder, though…

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you might planned.

I’m just editing THE UNQUIET HEART, the second Sarah Gilchrist novel, at the moment – that should be out in August 2018. I’m also in the first draft of the third book in the series, THE FATE OF EMPIRES, which is due out in 2019. Beyond that, I’m busy with my journalism career and doodling ideas for a non-fiction book I really want to write…

11. If you had the opportunity to write a novel with any crime writer alive or dead, who would it be and why

Deanna Raybourn! Not only does she also write terrific historical mysteries, she’s an absolute hoot on social media – I have a suspicion that if we sat down together, though, we’d have too much fun talking (and drinking cocktails) to write!

12.  Do you have words of advice you can share with anyone who is interested in writing a novel

Stick at it! But write for you, not for anyone else. Especially with your first book, you get to write 100% what you want – there’ll be time for other people’s input later.

Sarah Gilchrist has fled London and a troubled past to join the University of Edinburgh’s medical school in 1892, the first year it admits women. She is determined to become a doctor despite the misgivings of her family and society, but Sarah quickly finds plenty of barriers at school itself: professors who refuse to teach their new pupils, male students determined to force out their female counterparts, and—perhaps worst of all—her female peers who will do anything to avoid being associated with a fallen woman.

Desperate for a proper education, Sarah turns to one of the city’s ramshackle charitable hospitals for additional training. The St Giles’ Infirmary for Women ministers to the downtrodden and drunk, the thieves and whores with nowhere else to go. In this environment, alongside a group of smart and tough teachers, Sarah gets quite an education. But when Lucy, one of Sarah’s patients, turns up in the university dissecting room as a battered corpse, Sarah finds herself drawn into a murky underworld of bribery, brothels, and body snatchers.

Painfully aware of just how little separates her own life from that of her former patient’s, Sarah is determined to find out what happened to Lucy and bring those responsible for her death to justice. But as she searches for answers in Edinburgh’s dank alleyways, bawdy houses and fight clubs, Sarah comes closer and closer to uncovering one of Edinburgh’s most lucrative trades, and, in doing so, puts her own life at risk…

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