Russel D McLean launch of Cry Uncle

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The fifth J McNee novel is the most explosive yet, mixing the grit of the American hardboiled tradition
with a distinctly Scottish voice.

To celebrate the launch of the new novel, Russel will be speaking at the following events:

25 November: Edinburgh, Gilmerton Library, 13 Newtoft Street EH17 8RG: 7.00pm: free, tickets available from library

1 December: Dundee, Waterstones, 35 Commercial Street: 6.30pm: free, tickets available from venue.

2 December: Glasgow, Blackfriars Bar, 36 Bell Street, G1 1LG: 7.00pm: free entry

For further information please see: http://www.russeldmcleanbooks.com

November 2014 up and coming crime author of the month with a j mccreanor

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How did you get started writing?
As a child, I was a voracious reader, however it was only when I read J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye that I was inspired to write. I wrote lots of short stories and poetry which all ended up stuffed in a drawer. I went on to study English Literature at university and later became a teacher. I began writing short stories again and eventually wrote Riven.

What drew you to write a crime novel?
I’ve always loved reading crime fiction and the idea of the outsider. Also, the story I wanted to tell in Riven suited the genre.
Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?
I enjoyed reading William McIlvanney, Ian Rankin, Denise Mina, Mo Hayder and many more. I also attended an Arvon course on crime writing (tutored by Louise Welsh and Allan Guthrie) which I found both helpful and inspiring.

When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?
I submitted writing to various competitions. Eventually, as a result of winning one, I was put in touch with my agent who then secured a publishing deal. Riven is the first in a series of novels featuring DIs Wheeler and Ross.

There are many interesting characters in your Novel, do you have a particular favourite one?
I have two! My detectives Kat Wheeler and Steven Ross are my favourites, but I also have a soft spot for Andy Doyle.

What kind of research have you had to undertake for your Novel?
I didn’t do a lot of research. I was brought up in the East End of Glasgow, so the geography was familiar to me but I did research both forensic and police procedures.

Are the characters in your books based on anyone in real life?
No, everyone is a product of my imagination. (Although my husband swears that aspects of DI Ross are based on him.)

What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there?
The location is very important in Riven. It’s set in the East End of Glasgow, a place which is incredibly interesting and atmospheric. Also the novel doesn’t rely solely on a ‘good versus evil’ narrative. As human beings we often have to deal with complex moral and ethical decisions which can result in uncomfortable compromise. I hope this is reflected in some way in Riven.

Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?
I share Kat Wheeler’s love of Thelonious Monk and the Scottish Colourists but sadly not her discipline.

If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned?
The next novel, Silenced, will be published in September 2015. When Wheeler and Ross hunt a killer who is targeting a vulnerable group within society, the killer then makes it personal.

What was your favourite scene to write in your Novel and why?
It was the opening scene of Riven. I write in an organic (messy!) way and wait to see where it may fit into the book, but once I’d written that first scene I knew that it was the beginning of a novel.

As an up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share?
Keep writing. Share your work with friends and fellow writers. Listen to feedback. These are your first readers. And edit, rewrite, edit! And if it interests you as a writer, find a decent course.

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First he kills.

A psychologist is found brutally murdered, an addict jumps to his death and a student is found dead. These are the facts. And they are all that DIs Wheeler and Ross have.

He waits.

As Wheeler and Ross weave through the layers of Glasgow’s underbelly they find a subculture where truth and lies are interchangeable commodities and violence is the favoured currency.

He watches.

The killer stays one step ahead of them as Wheeler uncovers a web of deceit in which her own nephew is entangled.

He leaves his legacy…

And as the case draws to a close, Wheeler has to confront her own integrity and face the dilemma: is justice always served by the truth?

http://ajmccreanor.co.uk/

Amazon Author Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/A-J-McCreanor/e/B00MS2R3A8/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Free books

If you are looking for some good reads for your kindle that won’t break the bank, and you like Scottish crime fiction then these are the novel for you

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ONE MAN WILL STOP AT NOTHING TO FIND THE HUMAN SOUL

Detective Inspector Alex Menzies starts her first day in a new job with a call to the scene of a terrible murder. The body of a young man has been left on a funeral pyre with a hole in the middle of his forehead. The investigation into the bizarre murder is lead by Alex’s new boss Detective Superintendent Tom Russell.
A vicious, bigoted racist is the first suspect but within days the city is shocked by the discovery of another mutilated and burned body. The killer’s signature is a small cross placed in the victim’s hand and the terrifying possibility of the city’s first serial killer in over forty years gives the police investigators a challenge that will tax all their skills and combined experience.
New victims are found and with each death the case becomes more puzzling and the police more desperate. As fear grips Glasgow, the investigative team must find the Soulseeker before he kills again in his search for the truth about the human soul.

To buy this kindle book for yourself go to the Amazon Page

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Can you really trust The Only Survivor ?

When a helicopter crashes off the western coast of Garansay, there is only one survivor; a nineteen year old boy called Cameron Fleming.
He is quickly befriended by one of his rescuers, Michael Nichols. But when Michael’s sister and her family come to Garansay for the summer, Imogen Croft soon discovers that the boy is not quite as innocent as he seems…
‘The Only Survivor’ is the gripping second novel in the Imogen and Hugh Croft Mysteries series. Imogen and Hugh become dragged into the murky world of international organised crime, finding themselves terrifyingly out of their depth. They travel to the fascinating city of Dubai in order to solve the baffling puzzle behind the Fleming’s deaths. Returning to Garansay just in time to reveal the mystery’s dramatic and unexpected solution.

To buy this kindle book for yourself go to the Amazon Page

Free book

If you are looking for a good read for your kindle that won’t break the bank, and you like Scottish crime fiction then this is the novel for you

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Nancy Kerr refuses to be a victim – even when she walks in on her parents’ killers and is raped and left for dead. Fourteen months later, she wakes up in a psychiatric hospital with no knowledge of how she got there. Slowly her memory starts to return. Released from the institution, she has just one thing on her mind – two men brought hell to her family home. Now they’re in for some hell of their own.

Here is the Amazon link to buy this kindle book for yourself

November up and coming crime author of the month with Lisa ballantyne

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1. How did you get started writing?

I have written since I was very small, but started writing long fiction when I was living in China from 1996 – 2002. Initially, I was in very isolated areas in the South East and North West and my guitar and my pen and paper (no computer then) were my best friends.

2. What drew you to write a crime novel

I didn’t start out to write a crime novel. It wasn’t my initial intention…. but I was very drawn to the main character of Daniel as a child in foster care and his relationship with his foster mother, Minnie. It was exploring this key relationship and deciding to explore it from Daniel’s adult perspective, when he was a criminal solicitor defending a young boy accused of murder, that led me to write a crime novel.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

It is hard to say who has influenced you…. easier to say who you admire. I read a lot of literary novels: Margaret Atwood, Michael Ondaatje, Toni Morrison, William McIlvanney, Jackie Kay, Ali Smith, Joyce Carol Oates. At the moment I am discovering and loving Donna Tartt and Jenni Fagan.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

Yes. I managed to get an agent after finishing my second novel, but it would take another two novels before I managed to find a publisher.

5. There are many interesting characters in your novel, do you have a particular favourite one?

In The Guilty One, I think it’s obvious that, as a writer, I was most interested in Minnie and Daniel and their relationship – that is the emotional heart of the novel.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your Novels?

The Guilty One involved a lot of research. I went down to London to scout the locations and also visited The Old Bailey where I saw one of my heroines performing: Helena Kennedy QC.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?

Definitely not. I never consciously mine real life for my books. I write to escape the misery and ennui of real life. When I read I want to be transported into another world, and when I write I want the same…. it just takes a bit more effort!!!

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Crime Fiction Novels out there…

Maybe, it’s that I don’t see The Guilty One as a crime novel. I think that those who like gruesome, fast paced thrillers might be a bit disappointed. I took a lot of time making the characters rounded and real and I allowed myself time to let them unfold. This may frustrate many hard-boiled crime readers, but I am grateful to have found some readers who enjoyed.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

Again, I am not consciously mining myself for my characters, but I can empathise with them all. The characters in my books tend to be flawed, and I am flawed, so who knows!!

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned.

REDEMPTION ROAD, my new book, is out in e-book in January and out in July 2015 in paperback, although it is launched overseas in Australia and New Zealand in January. Very nervous about the reception, but again hope that people enjoy.

11.What was your favourite scene to write in your Novel and why

I enjoyed writing the scene which comprises chapter 2 in The Guilty One, when Daniel meets Minnie for the first time. I might have written this scene first before anything else in the novel…. It is the kernel of the novel for me… their relationship and its development.

12. As a up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share?

Again, I don’t see myself solely as a crime writer and so would hate to give advice on that, and also as an up and coming writer, I don’t feel I am in a position to give advice. The only thing I might say, is that a lot of people I meet think writing is easy and it’s not…. As Robert Louis Stevenson once said, “I don’t like writing very much, but I very much enjoy having written.”

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A little boy was found dead in a children’s playground…

Daniel Hunter has spent years defending lost causes as a solicitor in London. But his life changes when he is introduced to Sebastian, an eleven-year-old accused of murdering an innocent young boy.

As he plunges into the muddy depths of Sebastian’s troubled home life, Daniel thinks back to his own childhood in foster care – and to Minnie, the woman who adopted him and whose love saved him, until she, too, betrayed him so badly that he cut her out of his life.

But what crime did Minnie commit that made Daniel disregard her for 15 years? And will Daniel’s identification with a child on trial for murder make him question everything he ever believed in?

Deeply psychological and suspenseful, The Guilty One is already an international phenomenon and one of the most talked-about books of the year.

http://www.lisaballantyne.com

Amazon Author Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lisa-Ballantyne/e/B009AK6LW2/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

November 2014 up and coming crime author of the month with Wendy h jones

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How did you get started writing?

I came to writing through an academic route. I worked for many years in academia and wrote books and journals. After a period of illness I decided it was time to change direction and I moved back to Dundee, the City where I was born and grew up. I love murder mysteries and had the idea for a book in my head. I was challenged to do NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writers Month) and started writing fiction.

What drew you to write a crime novel?

I have been reading crime books almost since I could read. I started out with The Famous Five, Secret Seven, The Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew. By the age of ten I had read everything in the children’s section of the library. Being a feisty Dundonian I got my own way when I asked for an adult library card. I moved on to Agatha Christie, and have probably read every Crime author since. It was a natural progression to write crime.

Which writers, past or present, have influenced your style of writing?

I would have to say that my writing would be an amalgam of them all. I am an avid reader and have read so many different crime authors that it would be difficult to pick just one.

When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

It is very difficult to get publisher interest these days. Publishers, and agents, are inundated with submissions. Many publishers and agents are now looking at people who have self published successfully and already have a fan base.

There are many interesting characters in your novel. Do you have a favourite one?

My favourite would have to be Shona McKenzie. She is the Inspector in charge of the CID team at, what was then, Tayside Police. She is a feisty character, definitely in control, sharp and yet funny. Her team love her and criminals get on her bad side at their peril.

What sort of research have you had to undertake in order to write your novels.

I was fortunate in that my nursing background helped a lot with any medical information I needed. I have taught medical law, but that was in England. I had to research Scottish Law, which is, of course, completely different. The police were extremely helpful. Just as I was starting the second novel, Tayside Police became Police Scotland and my local police sergeant came round to my house and explained the implications of the changes.

Are the characters in your books based on any in real life?

No, I have deliberately avoided that.  One name is mentioned who is a real person and that person then becomes a character in their own right in book 2 in the series. I also ran a murder mystery dinner party in aid of charity. During this there was a raffle where the prize was to have your name as a character in my book. Although the winner is named the character is not based on them.

What do you think makes your books stand out from all the other Crime Fiction novels out there?

Although my books are gritty crime books, and there are plenty of dead bodies, they are also meant to be funny and down to earth. It is not all doom and gloom.

Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

I’ve deliberately tried not to base any of the characters on me personally but I suppose it cannot be completely avoided. The most obvious is, that both Shona and I have a dry sense of humour. I’d say she is funnier than I am, and gets away with a lot more.

Can you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned?

The next book in the series is almost completely written. In this Shona and her team are dealing with a number of murders and are wondering if it could be another serial killer. They are hampered by the fact that Dundee is in the grip of a blizzard. There are some gruesome scenes, but also moments of laugh out loud fun. I have ideas set out for a further seven books in the series. I am also bouncing around ideas for a completely different crime series.

What was your favourite scene to write in your novel and why?

It is difficult to choose just one but I would say the prologue. This is a flash-forward to a scene later in the book and it is very atmospheric.

As an up and coming crime writer do you have words or advice you can share?

The best piece of advice I was given is just sit down and write. You will never complete the novel if you do not start. Once you have completed the first draft then edit, edit, edit. Also use a professional editor and get a few people to edit the book. The on piece of advice I will give anyone when writing, is have fun. If you are not enjoying writing the book then this will come across in your writing. Enjoy the ride; writing is a great way to spend your time. Your characters will develop minds of their own and drag you along on their coat tails.

First book in the DI Shona McKenzie Series

Dead Women.

A Ruthless Killer.

A Detective with something to prove.

Newly Promoted DI Shona McKenzie struggles to cope with her new job, the respect of her colleagues, and the need to solve the hardest career of her life.

Will she succeed.

http://wendyhjones.com

Amazon Author Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Wendy-H.-Jones/e/B00OABSKH0/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1415104130&sr=8-1

October 2014 up and coming crime author of the month with Mason cross

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1. How did you get started writing?

I’ve always liked writing and making up stories, ever since I was a kid. My school reports always praised my imagination and criticised my habit of daydreaming in class – I think the two were closely related. I told a career advisor at school that the job I wanted was to write Batman. I used to write ‘Choose Your Own Adventure’ type books on my parents’ computer, which I would then print out and attempt to sell at school. I also created my own comics, which didn’t turn out so well due to a painful lack of artistic ability. So I guess in a very small way, I got some early experience of self-publishing through those ventures.

2. What drew you to write a crime novel

A couple of things: the first one is the fact I just really love to read crime fiction, from the classics like Chandler and Hammett right up to the present day with people like Connelly, Rankin, Child and Reichs. The second thing is that what I write seems to lend itself to crime and mystery more than any other genre. I enjoy horror and sci fi books and movies, but I’m not sure I would know how to write one. Similarly, I’d have no clue how to write a ‘literary’ novel. The elements I enjoy the most: memorable characters, snappy dialogue, mystery and plot twists, all lead me into the crime section, and you know what? I’m fine with that.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?

Stephen King, Ira Levin, Frank Miller, Neil Gaiman, Ian Rankin, John D. Macdonald, Denise Mina, Lee Child, James Ellroy, Elmore Leonard, Raymond Chandler, Kathy Reichs (to name but a few). I don’t consciously try to write like any of them, but I aspire to create work that gives others as much pleasure as the above writers have given me.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?

I didn’t get any publisher interested until I had an agent, but to be fair, I hadn’t submitted work to publishers as often as an aspiring writer probably should do. I tried my luck with various short stories and found it tough to get anything published, but I did have a few successes with small writing magazines and competitions. My biggest early success was to have a story called ‘A Living’ published in one of the Quick Reads books: The Sun Book of Short Stories.

5. There are many interesting characters in your novels, do you have a particular favourite one?

Obviously I have to say Carter Blake is a favourite, because he’s my protagonist, and the only character that’s in all of the novels. Having said that, my favourite characters to write in The Killing Season were Banner, who’s the supporting lead, and Wardell, who’s the villain. Those two are at the two extremes – Banner is a relatively normal person and Wardell is a mass-murdering psychopath. Blake is kind of in the middle.

6. What kind of research have you have to undertake for your novels?

Different types: obviously the internet is an incredible resource, as long as you do a bit of fact checking, but I like to read good old-fashioned books on subjects relevant to what I’m writing. I also incorporate my own personal experiences through travel. One of the biggest helps in writing a US-set thriller series is having American friends I can interrogate to make sure I get the details right as far as possible.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life

No. For one thing, that’s a great way to get sued, for another thing, it’s much easier to simply invent a character than to try and fit a real person into a book. I do take elements here and there from people I’ve encountered, or add memorable snippets of dialogue I’ve heard in real life, but mostly the characters are completely imagined.

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there

The fact that it’s a very American Scottish crime novel! I think Glasgow (where I’m from) has a particularly pronounced American influence, probably from having been such a big shipping town historically. You can see that influence in a lot of ways, from the fact we love country music to the number of successful writers of American superhero comics from here. Even the grid plan of the city centre feels more like an American city than a British one.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?

A little bit. Blake likes process – he’s obsessively driven to complete a job once he’s set himself a goal. He’s also a little tunnel-visioned sometimes and has a tendency to infuriate those who spend time with him. My wife will vouch for the fact that that could describe me. He’s much smarter and better in a fight than me, though.

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned.

The next one’s called The Samaritan. It’s about a serial killer who prays on drivers who have broken down late at night on deserted roads. Blake realises he may know who’s doing the killing, and gets himself involved in the investigation.

11. Out of all the novels you have written do you have a favourite one that stands out to you?

The most recent one is always a favourite, but I’m excited about the next novel I’m about to start, which is going to be called Winterlong, and should be out in 2016.

12. As a well known crime writer do you have words of advice you can share

I’m certainly not well-known but am flattered by the suggestion! My best advice for writers is the usual: keep writing and don’t give up. Even if you think something’s rubbish, it might turn out not so bad. Remember: there are a thousand ways to fix a rough draft; there’s only one way to fix a blank sheet of paper.

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The first thing you should know about me is that my name is not Carter Blake.
That name no more belongs to me than the hotel room I was occupying when the call came in.

When Caleb Wardell, the infamous ‘Chicago Sniper’, escapes from death row two weeks before his execution, the FBI calls on the services of Carter Blake, a man with certain specialised talents whose skills lie in finding those who don’t want to be found. A man to whom Wardell is no stranger.

Along with Elaine Banner, an ambitious special agent juggling life as a single mother with her increasingly high-flying career, Blake must track Wardell down as he cuts a swathe across America, apparently killing at random.

But Blake and Banner soon find themselves sidelined from the case. And as they try desperately to second guess a man who kills purely for the thrill of it, they uncover a hornets’ nest of lies and corruption. Now Blake must break the rules and go head to head with the FBI if he is to stop Wardell and expose a deadly conspiracy that will rock the country.

http://carterblake.net/

Amazon Author Page

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mason-Cross/e/B00FWO52KC/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Crime Authors and Book week Scotland 2014

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Bloody Scotland presents Sam Alexander
Monday 24th November, 7pm. Free, unticketed.
Waterstones, 174 Argyle Street, Glasgow, G2 8BT
After months of online speculation, we unmasked the identity of Sam Alexander as none other than CWA Dagger Award winner Paul Johnston, author of three bestselling series of crime novels, including Greek detective Mavros.  In this exclusive event, we are proud to support an international author from Scotland and his publisher Arcadia Books who have created quite a stir around the author’s mysterious identity.

Paul Johnston is a seasoned hand at crime thriller writing and his first Sam Alexander novel, set in the North of England, represents a new direction in his writing career. Carnal Acts has garnered glowing reviews with a new approach to the police procedural novel.

Join us in Waterstones Argyle Street on Monday 24th November to toast the start of Book Week Scotland with this exciting event.

The event is free and no ticket is required.

Drime Writers’ Mr and Mrs
Thursday 27th November, 7pm. Free, unticketed.
Waterstones, 174 Argyle Street, Glasgow, G2 8BT

Waterstones are hosting a panel event with some of our favourite literary couples: Helen Fitzgerald & Sergio Casci, Craig Robertson & Alexandra Sokoloff and Russel McLean & Lesley McDowell; discussing the pros (of which there must be many!) and cons of living and working together. It should be a great night and hopefully no one will be crying by the end!

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BEER BOOK BURGER CARO RAMSAY AND CHRISTOPHER BROOKMYRE

For a taste of something truly different come along to an evening combining the Scottish loves of eating, drinking and a bit of banter.

Hear acclaimed Scottish novelists, Christopher Brookmyre and Caro Ramsay talk about their work and feed your stomach as well as your soul at our Book, A Beer and a Burger event at Kirkcaldy Galleries. Ward of the winter chill with an evening of lively banter between the two authors accompanied by a pint and a tasty burger.

Address
Kirkcaldy Galleries
Bennochy Road
War Memorial Gardens
Kirkcaldy
KY1 1YT
United Kingdom
Time
19:30 – 21:00
Date
25 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
01592 583204
Region
Fife
Contact email
jennifer.stewart@fife.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Paid, Ticketed

QUINTIN JARDINE

Quintin Jardine will be appearing on Saturday 1st November at the following Waterstones Stores to do signings

10.45am-11.15pm
Waterstones, 175 High Street, Kirkcaldy KY1 1JA.

12.30pm-1pm
Waterstones, 101-103 Market Street, Andrews KY16 9NX

2.15pm-2.45pm
Waterstones, St John’s Centre, Perth PH1 5UX

4pm-4.30pm
Waterstones, The Elements, Almondvale Shopping Centre, Livingston EH54 6GS

LIN ANDERSON

An evening with celebrated crime writer Lin Anderson.

Address
Greenock Central Library
75-81 Cathcart Street
GREENOCK
PA15 1DE
United Kingdom
Time
19:00 – 20:30
Date
25 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
01475 712323
Region
Inverclyde
Contact email
library.central@inverclyde.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, unticketed (turn up on the day before event start)

ANN CLEEVES

Not just for ladies who lunch, this is a fantastic opportunity for all crime fiction fans to join Ann Cleeves, bestselling author of the novels behind BBC’s Shetland series and ITV’s Vera, over lunch in St Andrews Library.

Sit back and enjoy listening to one of the most popular and talented crime writers around, and if you’re at work, what better way to spend your lunch hour than in the company of Ann.

Address
St Andrews Public Library
Church Square
St Andrews
KY16 9NN
United Kingdom
Time
12:30 – 14:00
Date
27 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
01592 583204
Region
Fife
Contact email
jennifer.stewart@onfife.com

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Paid, ticketed

Also Appearing at the following events

As part of a celebration of libraries and reading, popular crime-writer Ann Cleeves has created a Shetland-themed grisly murder mystery which will be played out in Midlothian Libraries especially for Book Week Scotland. A woman has been murdered in the Ravenswick hotel library and it’s your task to find the killer.

Address
Newtongrange Library
St Davids
Newtongrange
EH22 4LG
United Kingdom
Time
19:00 – 20:30
Date
25 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
0131 663 1816
Region
Midlothian
Contact email
jacqueline.elliot@midlothian.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, ticketed

Also being held at

Address
Gorebridge Library
98 Hunterfield Road
Gorebridge
EH23 4TT
United Kingdom
Time
19:00 – 20:30
Date
25 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
01875 820630
Region
Midlothian
Contact email
elaine.robertson@midlothian.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, ticketed

Address
Loanhead Library
1A George Avenue
Loanhead
EH20 9HD
United Kingdom
Time
19:00 – 20:30
Date
27 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
0131 440 0824
Region
Midlothian
Contact email
annabel.cavaroli@midlothian.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, ticketed

JAMES OSWALD

About this event
Originally self-published in 2012, (James’ first book in his DI McLean series Natural Causes) , James has now moved on- he’s now a bestselling author of fantasy and crime books, his crime books shifting an extraordinary 250,000 copies, with Penguin as publisher.

Address
Muirhouse Library
15 Pennywell Court
Edinburgh
EH4 4TZ
United Kingdom
Time
15:00 – 16:00
Date
29 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
0131 529 5528
Region
Edinburgh
Contact email
annie.bell@edinburgh.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, ticketed

RUSSELL MCLEAN

Author of crime novels The Good Son and The Lost Sister, (featuring Scots Private Investigator, J McNee) Russell McLean also writes short stories, one of which, “Pedro Paul”, was singled out by Publisher’s Weekly as “awesomely dark”.

Address
Gilmerton Library
13 Newtoft Street
Edinburgh
EH17 8RG
United Kingdom
Time
19:00 – 20:00
Date
26 November 2014
Telephone number for queries
0131 529 5628
Region
Edinburgh
Contact email
annie.bell@edinburgh.gov.uk

Is the venue accessible?
Yes
Ticketed?
Free, ticketed

For more information about these and other events you can go to the following website

http://www.scottishbooktrust.com/events/event-types/crime

October 2014 up and coming crime author of the month with Tom odgen keenan

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1. How did you get started writing?
Possibly in the days of ‘love and peace man (giving my age away!)’ when everyone was writing poems and songs about war, life, love. I never took it seriously until I had a go at writing a play and was invited to a play writing workshop by 7:84, which was a great experience. I think writing dialogue spurred me to writing fiction (easy, just fill in the gaps between the dialogue!), and when I started I couldn’t stop.

2. What drew you to write a crime novel
I didn’t really think it was a crime novel until a friend mentioned the first chapter of one of my earlier attempts was like a Quentin Tarantino movie. My writing has always been ‘edgy’, dark, with a bit of sardonic humour, possibly influenced by living in Glasgow.

3. Which writers past or present have influenced your style of writing?
I like to write what I like to read, i.e. writers that keep you on edge, get your emotions going, stab your consciousness. I loved Dostoevsky and his conscience changing characters, or Luke Rhinehart, the Dice Man, where anything goes; but also been greatly influenced by local ‘noir’ writers like William McIlvanney and his Laidlaw, and of course most stuff from Mr Rankin. I also love Jim Kelman, his fantastic dialogue, and Alasdair Gray’s Lanark.

4. When you first started writing did you find it hard to get publisher interest?
Impossible; although as my writing improved the rejection letters became more personal! I think I rewrote my first version of The Father about fifty times and it still wasn’t right. I got shortlisted for the Debut Dagger which was a real boost; an indication for me and prospective publishers that I was on the right path.

5. There are many interesting characters in your Novel, do you have a particular favourite one?
Not really, I think I like ‘bad’ characters more than the heroes; you can do more with them.

6. What kind of research have you had to undertake for your Novels?
Spending a lot of time in seedy pubs trying to get grasp of the way people talk to each other. The Web is such a cheater’s source of information and I exploit it shamelessly; but you can’t beat ‘walking the walk’. I have also been a social worker in mental health for over thirty years, so lots to draw on.

7. Are the characters in your books based on any real life?
Oh yes, some are a composite of some real life characters I’ve known; but sometimes I try to imagine some famous characters and place them in certain scenes. It’s fun thinking about John Cleese as a psychopath.

8. What do you think makes your novels stand out from all the other Scottish Crime Fiction Novels out there
I think I go deep into the characters minds, mess with their heads and their relationships, transform them from good to bad, from bad to good. My tag line for the Father ‘can a good man be made bad’, gives an idea.

9. Do you see any of your characters personality in yourself and vice versa?
I guess there is a lot of the writer in his main protagonist. I see something of him in me and some things of me in him, but I am not an alcoholic, I don’t have a mental illness, and I don’t have a predilection for serial killers who kill by proxy.

10. If you can, would you give us a sneaky peak into any future novels you have planned.
The Father is first in the Sean Rooney series. I’ve started writing the second. I’m playing around with having two antagonists at the start with one become the hero as the story progresses, not sure which one though! It’s fun playing God!

11. What was your favourite scene to write in your Novel and why
I like my prologue, which really sets the scene (of the book). I just let it all go, hitting the reader with a barrage of imagery.

12. As a up and coming crime writer do you have words of advice you can share
Just keep working it; flex that creative muscle in your head and don’t fear criticism, use it to grow; and write every day, whether you feel like it or not.

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Mental illness, alcohol abuse, and the tedium of pursuing typical killers, leave Sean Rooney a pathetic man, a failed forensic profiler, a bit of a loser and definitely retired. DCI Jacqueline Kaminski has other ideas. Faced with a multiple murder – and some headless corpses – she needs Rooney back on the case.

https://www.tom-odgen-keenan.co.uk/

Amazon Author Page

Bloody Scotland stirling Saturday 20th September 2014

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Bloody Scotland 2014 Question Time

Q) What makes your books stand out from the rest

PETER ROBINSON
The Yorkshire Setting that has become like a character in its own right and adds a different flavour

CATRIONA MACPHERSON
The strong balance between hard hitting crime and the light funny comedic timing

EVA DOLAN
The strong attention given to political and social issues that are rising in the UK Society and exposing them

HANIA ALLEN
The strong female lead character with a good heart

MASON CROSS
The American Angle, A Scottish Writer setting his novels in America and the FUN

FRANK MUIR
The Fife Setting, The strong use of Black Humour and the arrival of a different kind of female detective character in Glasgow Born DS Jessie Janes

CRAIG ROBERTSON
The Sense of Place that runs throughout the books be it Glasgow or the Fareo Islands

MICHAEL MALONE
The Banter